Contact Zhi-Yong Wang at Carnegie's Department of Plant Biology, 650-325-1521 ext. 205, or via e-mail at zywang24@stanford.edu

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Contact Carnegie’s Dr. Gregory Asner, at 650-380-2828, gpa@stanford.edu,

or Stanford’s Peter Vitousek, at vitousek@stanford.edu

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Contact: Ivo Labbé at the Carnegie Observatories, ivo@ociw.edu, or 626-304-0265;

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Contact Tina McDowell@ 202-939-1120, or tmcdowell@ciw.edu

 

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Contact Douglas Rumble, III, Carnegie Geophysical Laboratory, 202 478- 8990, rumble@gl.ciw.edu

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The President and Trustees of the Carnegie Institution

cordially invite you to view the

 

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Contact Dr. Russell Hemley at 202- 478-8951, r.hemley@gl.ciw.edu;

or Chih-Shiue Yan at 202-478-8959, c.yan@gl.ciw.edu

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Contacts: Robert Sanders, University of California, Berkeley: (510) 643-6998, rsanders@berkeley.edu

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Contact Maud Boyet at 202-478-8482 / boyet@dtm.ciw.edu

or Rick Carlson at 202-478-8474 / carlson@dtm.ciw.edu

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Contact Jung-Fu Lin at 202-478-8911, j.lin@gl.ciw.edu; Ho-kwang Mao,h.mao@gl.ciw.edu 202-321-8899;

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Contact Jung-Fu Lin at 925-424-4157, j.lin@gl.ciw.edu; Viktor Struzhkin at 202-478-8952, v.struzhkin@gl.ciw.edu; or

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Contact Armando Gil de Paz at 626-304-0273, agpaz@ociw.edu; or
Barry Madore at 626-304-0247, bmadore@ociw.edu, orbarry@ipac.caltech.edu

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Contact Frances Donald 44 0 1592 643 200, fdonald@catchline.co.uk

Or Alex Barr 44 0 141 333 9585

 

Images available from Frances Donald

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First Minister Jack McConnell is to present entrepreneur and philanthropist Sir Tom Farmer with the philanthropic equivalent of a Nobel Prize, the Carnegie UK Trusts announced today.

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Contact at Carnegie, Marilyn Fogel at 202-478-8981, email...

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Contact Carnegie’s Dr. Gregory Asner, office 650-462-1047 x202; cell 650-380-2828; e-mail gasner@globalecology.stanford.edu

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Shauna Somerville; ssomerville@stanford.edu or (650) 325-1521 ext. 257

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Contact : Dr. Benjamin Ohlstein, 410-246-3003, or 3403, email, ohlstein@ciwemb.edu;

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Washington, D.C.--New theoretical work shows that gas-giant planet formation can occur around binary stars in much the same way that it occurs around single stars like the Sun. The work is presented today by Dr.

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Washington, D.C. -- On January 20, 2006, Moody’s Investors Service assigned a Aaa/VMIG1 rating to the Carnegie Institution’s Series 2006 bonds issued though the California Educational Facilities Authority.

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Stanford, CA – Scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology have found that photosynthetic bacteria living in scalding Yellowstone hot springs have two radically different metabolic identities.

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Carnegie scientists breathed a sigh of relief on Sunday, January 15 when NASA’s Stardust mission landed safely with the first solid comet samples ever brought back to Earth.

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Stanford, CA -- Increased carbon dioxide emissions are rapidly making the world’s oceans more acidic and, if unabated, could cause a mass extinction of marine life similar to one that occurred 65 million years ago when the dinosaurs disappeared.

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Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee:

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Washington, DC – Like modern day alchemists, materials scientists often turn unassuming substances into desirable ones.

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Washington, D.C. Today’s climate change pales in comparison with what happened as Earth gave birth to its oxygen-containing atmosphere billions of years ago.

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Washington, D.C. Rocky planets such as Earth and Mars are born when small particles smash together to form larger, planet-sized clusters in a planet-forming disk, but researchers are less sure about how gas-giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn form.

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Washington, D.C. Evidence never dies in the popular TV show Cold Case. Nor do some traces of life disappear on Earth, Mars, or elsewhere.

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Washington, D.C. On Sunday, January 15, NASA’s Stardust mission landed safely with the first solid comet fragments ever brought back to Earth.

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Baltimore, MD – We are all familiar with the dangers of too much fat in our diet—increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity are just a few of the most severe consequences.

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Pasadena, CA. The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), the first extremely large new-generation telescope to begin production, has gained a new partner—the Australian National University (ANU) http://www.anu.edu.au/.

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Stanford, CA – Cellulose—a fibrous molecule found in all plants—is the most abundant biological material on Earth. It is also a favored target of renewable, plant-based biofuels research.

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Washington, DC. To truly understand some of the movement we see at the Earth’s surface, scientists have to probe deep into the interior. A region near the planet’s core, about 1,800 miles down called the core-mantle boundary, is particularly intriguing.

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Washington, DC – Like an interplanetary spaceship carrying passengers, meteorites have long been suspected of ferrying relatively young ingredients of life to our planet.

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Washington, DC – Nobel laureate and Carnegie trustee emeritus Charles H. Townes has received the 2006 Vannevar Bush Award from the National Science Board, the oversight body of the National Science Foundation.

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Washington, DC – Minerals crunched by intense pressure near the Earth’s core lose much of their ability to conduct infrared light, according to a new study from the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory.

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Washington, D.C. Astronomers detected unusually high quantities of carbon, the basis of all terrestrial life, in an infant solar system around nearby star Beta Pictoris, 63 light-years away. “For years we’ve looked to this early forming solar system as one that might be going...

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Washington, DC. A new explanation for forming “super-Earths” suggests that they are more likely to be found orbiting red dwarf stars—the most abundant type of star—than gas giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn. The theory, by Dr.

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Washington, DC – Three new objects locked into roughly the same orbit as Neptune—called “Trojan” asteroids—have been found by researchers from the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) and the Gemini Observatory.

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Washington, DC – The Carnegie Institution of Washington and the University of Massachusetts Medical School announced today that opposition in Australia to the grant of the institutions’ patent application related to the discovery of RNAi has been withdrawn.

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Carnegie Institution planetary-formation theorist and 1997 National Medal of Science recipient George Wetherill died from heart failure on July 19, 2006, at his Washington, D.C. home.

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Washington, DC— As part of its international scientific exchange effort, the Fulbright Senior Specialists Program has awarded Carnegie scientist Marilyn Fogel a grant to share the most up-to-date findings in the fields of astrobiology and biogeochemistry with staff and students at...

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STANFORD, CA-A team of scientists, led by Greg Asner of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology, has discovered an important indicator of rain forest vulnerability to clear-cutting in Brazil.

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James A. Van Allen, Carnegie (DTM) alumnus and pioneering discoverer of Earth's radiation belts, has died at age 91.

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The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism's Sara Seager has been named one of this year's Brilliant 10 by Popular Science.

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Contact: Gary Kowalczyk, Director of Administration and Finance;
(202) 939-1118 or gkowalczyk@ciw.edu

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The Baltimore Sun profiles high-risk research at Carnegie Institution's Department of Embryology where...

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Washington, D.C. - The Carnegie Institution announced today that the United States Patent Office has recently granted a patent for the work of three inventors--Russell Hemley, Ho-kwang Mao, and Chih-Shiue Yan--related to the manufacture of a hard, single-crystal diamond.
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Plant Biology's Shauna Somerville has been elected a 2006 Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Mark Seibert, (626) 304-0273 or mseibert@ociw.edu

 

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Stanford, Calif. – Over a span of two decades, warming temperatures have caused annual losses of roughly $5 billion for major food crops, according to a new study by researchers at the Carnegie Institution and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

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Global Ecology director Chris Field discusses his latest work, which demonstrates that global warming has already significantly affected agriculture, in a video...

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The Lab-On-a-Chip, developed at Carnegie in collaboration with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Charles River Labs, has been successfully tested on the space...

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Stanford, Calif. – Planting and protecting trees—which trap and absorb carbon dioxide as they grow—can help to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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Stanford, CA.The American Institute of Architects (AIA) announced this week that Carnegie’s Global Ecology department building is among the top 10 buildings in the country that are “examples of sustainable architecture and green design solutions that promote...

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The President and Trustees of the Carnegie Institution

cordially invite you to view the

 

CARNEGIE EVENING LECTURE

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Washington, DC – Paul Silver, a geophysicist at Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism in Washington, DC, was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on Friday, April 27. Out of more than 1,100 nominees, 227 were elected as Fellows.

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Stanford, CA – Tropical plants are able to adapt to environmental change by extracting nitrogen from a variety of sources, according to a new study that appears in the May 7 early online edition of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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According to ISI's Web of Science, two of Joe Berry's papers passed extremely high, rarefied citation milestones last week.

The following 1980 paper just passed its 1,500th citation:

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Christopher Field
(650) 462-1047 x201 or cfield@globalecology.stanford.edu

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Contact: Russell Hemley at (202) 478-8951 or r.hemley@gl.ciw.edu;

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Dr. Greg Asner of Carnegie's Department of Global Ecology discusses laser-generated topographic images in on-demand video.

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Isamu Matsuyama
(202) 478-8863 or (matsuyama@dtm.ciw.edu)

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Kenneth L. Franklin, who from 1954 to 1956 was a research fellow in radio astronomy at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, has died at 84 following heart surgery.

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The skies over Hawaii buzz with the propellers of small aircraft. Most of them ferry people among the islands, or give tourists a glimpse of inaccessible locales.

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Mark Phillips

011-56-51-207301 or (mmp@lco.cl)

 

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Contact Ho-kwang (Dave) Mao at 202-478- 8960, or h.mao@gl.ciw.edu

Contact Russell Hemley at 202-478-8951,or rhemley@ciw.edu

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Carnegie Institution Observatories researchers are featured in Astronomy Magazine discussing dark matter and what supernovae may tell us about the fate of the universe.

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August 15, 2007

Contact Dr. Mark Seibert

(626) 304-0273 or mseibert@ociw.edu

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Winslow Briggs;

(650) 325-1521 x207 or briggs@stanford.edu

For a copy of the paper, please contact:

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Washington DC*-- Key components of a new approach to discover life on Mars were successfully launched into space...

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Washington, D.C. In the first experiments able to mimic the crushing, searing conditions found in Earth’s lower mantle, and simultaneously probe tell-...

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Senior trustee William T. Golden died on Sunday October 7 at the age of 97. Bill Golden was an icon of American science policy, and the Carnegie Institution was privileged to have his support and guidance for more than 35 years.

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Genes of a tiny, single-celled green alga called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may contain scores more data about the common ancestry of plants and animals than the richest paleontological dig.

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Former Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) director Inés Cifuentes has won this year’s Hispanic Heritage Award for Math and Science. Instituted by the White House in 1987, the Hispanic Heritage Awards are the most prestigious Hispanic honors in America...

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Carnegie scientists Chris Field and Ken Caldeira of the Department of Global Ecology are key contributors in the UN panel awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize on October 12 for work on global climate change.  The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) shares...

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Greg Asner of the Department of Global Ecology has been picked by Popular Science magazine as one of its annual “Brillant 10.” According to the magazine’s November issue, Brilliant 10 researchers “challenge what we thought it was possible to know,” and Asner “created a...
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The Norwegian Embassy brings together scientists from both sides of the Atlantic for its Annual Science Week at the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C.

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Stanford, CA -- Human activities are releasing carbon dioxide faster than ever, while the natural processes that normally slow its build up in the atmosphere appear to be weakening. These...

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The first “State of the Carbon Cycle Report” for North America, released online this week by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, finds the continent’s carbon budget increasingly overwhelmed by human-caused emissions.

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Pasadena CA—Typically, little M-dwarf stars—the most common type of star in the galaxy—are cold, quiet, and dim. Now a team of astronomers led by Edo Berger, a Carnegie-Princeton postdoctoral fellow, found one M-dwarf that doesn’t conform.

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Stanford, CA — Carbon emissions from human activities are not just heating up the globe, they are changing the ocean’s chemistry.

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January 1, 2008

Speaker: Simon Levin
A sustainable future for humanity will require finding a way to share our complex environment. Learn about the evolution of cooperation in non-human populations, and what must change in our own behaviors if we are to have a common future.

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Washington, DC— Astronomers at the Carnegie Institution have found the first indications of highly complex organic molecules in the disk of red dust surrounding a distant star.

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Plate tectonics, the geologic process responsible for creating the Earth’s continents, mountain ranges, and ocean basins, may be an on-again, off-again affair.

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After a journey of more than 2.2 billion miles and three and a half years, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft made its first flyby of Mercury just after 2 PM Eastern Standard Time on January 14, 2008.

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A discovery by scientists at the Carnegie Institution has opened the door to a new generation of piezoelectric materials that can convert mechanical strain into electricity and vice versa, potentially cutting costs and boosting performance in myriad applications ranging from medical...

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Long-time Carnegie Institution trustee William T. Golden was honored on January 25 by a symposium held in the institution's auditorium. Friends and colleagues recollected his decades of service to the institution, the nation, and the nearly 100 other organizations to which he lent his...

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Stanford, CA — Now that scientists have reached a consensus that carbon dioxide emissions from human activities are the major cause of global warming, the next question is: How can we stop it? Can we just cut back on carbon, or do we need to go cold turkey?

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Washington, DC — Interstellar space may be strewn with tiny whiskers of carbon, dimming the light of far-away objects.

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Stanford, CA—To the list of threats to...

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Stanford, CA — A startling discovery by scientists at the Carnegie Institution puts a new twist on photosynthesis, arguably the most important biological process on Earth.

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Washington, DC—The organic soup that spawned life on Earth may have gotten generous helpings from outer space, according to a new study.

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CarnegieScience is the newsletter of the Carnegie Institution for Science. It comes out three times a year and features Carnegie science and other activitities.
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Stanford, CA—The Earth’s jet streams, the high-altitude bands of fast winds that strongly influence the paths of storms and other weather systems, are shifting—possibly in response to global warming.

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Stanford, CA— Over millions of years carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have been moderated by a finely tuned natural feedback system—a system that human emissions have recently overwhelmed.

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Washington, DC—Superconductors can convey more than 150 times more electricity than copper wires because they don’t restrict electron movement, the essence of electricity.

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Pasadena, CA. Astronomers have seen the aftermath of spectacular stellar explosions known as supernovae before, but until now no one has witnessed a star dying in real time. While looking at another object in the spiral galaxy NGC...

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Tropical rain forests are treasure houses of biodiversity, but there has been no effective way to inventory and monitor their plant species over large areas.

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Washington, D.C.—The world’s richest source of platinum and related metals is an enigmatic geological structure in South Africa known as the Bushveld Complex.

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CarnegieScience is the newsletter of the Carnegie Institution for Science. It comes out three times a year and features Carnegie science and other activitities.
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Stanford, CA— Nitrogen is essential to all life on Earth, and the processes by which it cycles through the environment may determine how ecosystems respond to global warming.

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The Euroscience Open Forum (ESOF) will take place this summer in Barcelona, from 18 to 22 July. ESOF2008 is not just a scientific conference.
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Washington, D.C.—Higher than expected levels of sodium found in a 4.6 billion-year-old meteorite suggest that the dust clouds from which the building blocks of the Earth and neighboring planets formed were much denser than previously supposed.

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Stanford, CA—Biofuels can be a sustainable part of the world’s energy future, especially if bioenergy agriculture is developed on currently abandoned or degraded agricultural lands, report scientists from the Carnegie Institution and Stanford University. Using these...

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It’s not just about climate change anymore. Besides loading the atmosphere with heat-trapping greenhouse gases, human emissions of carbon dioxide have also begun to alter the chemistry of the ocean—often called the cradle of life on Earth.

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Paul Silver discusses his research in a video interview.

...

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Washington, D.C.— Carnegie geochemist Richard Carlson will receive the 2008 Norman L. Bowen Award from the American Geophysical Union.

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Stanford, CA—Steroids bulk up plants just as they do human athletes, but the playbook of molecular signals that tell the genes to boost growth and development in plant cells is far more complicated than in human and animal cells.

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Listen to the lecture here:
iTunes U

Download the Powerpoint presentation here:...

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Washington, D.C.— Nitrogen atoms like to travel in pairs, hooked together by one of the strongest chemical bonds in nature. By subjecting nitrogen molecules to extreme temperatures and pressures scientists are getting a new understanding of not only nitrogen but other...

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Selecting life: Scientists find new way to search for origin of life - Carnegie Institution News

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Stanford, CA—How much carbon dioxide is too much?

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September 25, 2008

Speaker: Eric Roston and James Gustave Speth

Eric Roston - Duke University, The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, Author of The Carbon Age: How Life’s Core Element Has Become Civilization’s Greatest Threat

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Washington, D.C.—Canadian bedrock more than four billion years old may be the oldest known section of the Earth’s early crust. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution used geochemical methods to obtain an age of 4.28 billion years for samples of the rock, making...

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Washington, D.C.—For several decades, scientists have thought that the Solar...

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Washington, D.C.— Robert Hazen, senior staff scientist at the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory, will receive the 2009 Distinguished Public Service Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America.

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Washington, D.C.—The building blocks of life may have emerged in volcanic eruptions on the early Earth, according to a new analysis of classic experiments performed more than fifty years ago. Using modern techniques to examine samples from the original experiments,...

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Carnegie's Wes Huntress joins other space community leaders to form an alternative vision...

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Washington, D.C.— Researchers at the Carnegie Institution have developed a new technique for improving the properties of diamonds—not only adding sparkle to gemstones, but also simplifying the process of making high-quality diamond for scalpel blades, electronic...

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Stanford, CA— In submitted testimony to the British Parliament, climate scientist Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution said that while steep cuts in carbon emissions are essential to stabilizing global climate, there also needs to be a backup plan. Geoengineering...

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Will the changing jet stream produce more hurricanes? Have researchers discovered an earthquake predictor? Read the fall 2008 CarnegieScience to find out.

Engineering better crops on...

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The key to understanding Earth’s evolution, including how our atmosphere gained oxygen and how volcanoes and earthquakes form, is to look deep, really deep, into the...

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Scientists may have overcome a major hurdle to calculating how much carbon dioxide (CO2) is absorbed and released by plants, vital information for understanding how...

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"Dove Courtesy of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Analysis"

This year's winning holiday card was submitted by Shaun Bailey and Blaise Hamel from the Department of Plant Biology.

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Researchers have discovered that the ocean’s chemical makeup is less stable and more greatly affected by climate change than previously believed. The researchers report in the December 12, 2008 issue of Science* that during a time of climate change 13 million years...

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Washington, D.C.-The Carnegie Institution has been awarded a $9,400 grant from the Center for History of Physics, American Institute of Physics, to preserve and enhance access to a collection of historic photographs of scientific instruments and...

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Washington D.C.—Christopher B. Field, director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology, and Douglas E.

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The Carnegie Institution is now on Apple's iTunesU. Lectures, interviews, news, and information about the institution are available through the popular, free application and mobile learning site.

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Stanford, CAA lack of technology needed to explore and monitor vast regions of tropical rain forest has been a critical...

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Baltimore, MD—Stem cells are the body’s primal cells, retaining the youthful ability to develop into more specialized types of cells over many cycles of cell division. How do they do it? Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have identified a gene, named scrawny,...

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Washington, D.C.
Asteroids are hunks of...

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Washington, D.C. Two independent groups have simultaneously made the first-ever ground-based detection of extrasolar planets thermal emissions. Until now, virtually everything known about atmospheres of planets orbiting other stars in the Milky...

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January 20, 2009

Speaker: Steven Beckwith
Do you ever question the Big Bang? The Hubble Space Telescope has now looked far enough back in time to reveal the universe when it was very young and shows how different it really looked.

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January 27, 2009

A documentary film about Eric Kandel by Petra Seeger FilmForm Köln, 2008

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Washington, D.C.-Here on Earth we worry about our planet's atmosphere warming by a few degrees on average over the next century, and even weather fronts bring temporary changes in temperature of no more than tens of degrees....

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Washington, D.C.An international team of researchers including scientists at the Carnegie Institution has discovered a new chemical compound that consists of a single element―boron....
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Washington, D.C.In recent years researchers have...

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Stanford, CA— Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are rising more rapidly than expected, increasing the danger that without aggressive action to reduce emissions the...

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SANTA CRUZ, CA--Sandra Faber, University Professor and chair of astronomy and...

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Pasadena, CAEvidence of star birth within a cloud of...

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Stanford, CA The African savanna is world famous for its wildlife, especially the iconic large herbivores such as elephants, zebras, and giraffes. But...

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Stanford, CA—One of the rationales behind basic research is to provide the scientific foundations for good public policy. Carnegie scientists have always done their share, but the Department of Global Ecology...

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Washington, D.C.Ever since the Bronze Age, humans...

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Stanford, CARising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere...

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Stanford, CARolling Stone magazine has ranked Global Ecology'...

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Washington, D.C.Unraveling the origins of...

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Washington, D.C.The car-sized asteroi...

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100 Hours of Astronomy (100HA) is a worldwide celebration to involving the public in the excitement of...
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Washington, D.C.The Earth’s original atmosphere held very little oxygen. This began to change around 2.4 billion years ago when oxygen levels increased dramatically...

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Pasadena, CA —Using information from a suite of telescopes, astronomers have discovered a mysterious, giant object that existed at a time when the universe was only about 800 million years old. Objects such as this one are dubbed extended Lyman-Alpha blobs;...

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Washington, DC—The most powerful earthquakes happen at the junction of two converging...

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Analyses of data from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft’s second flyby of Mercury in October 2008 show that the planet’s atmosphere, magnetosphere, and geological past are all characterized by much greater levels...
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STANFORD, CA - Biofuels such as ethanol offer an alternative to petroleum for powering our cars, but growing energy crops to produce them can compete with food crops for farmland, and clearing forests to expand farmland will aggravate the climate change problem. How can we...

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Stanford, CAThe Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant...

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Pasadena, CA—The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation awarded the 2009 Cosmology Prize to Carnegie’s Wendy Freedman; Robert Kennicutt...

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Argonne, IL—Millions of people today carry around pocket-sized music players capable of holding thousands of songs, thanks to the discovery 20 years ago of a phenomenon known as the “giant...

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Palo Alto, CA—Cellulose is a fibrous molecule that makes up plant cell walls, gives...

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Washington, D.C. To combat the trend of declining qualified mathematics teachers in middle and high...

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In the future, will wind power tapped by high-flying kites light up New York? A new study by scientists at the Carnegie Institution and California State University identifies New York as a prime location for exploiting high-altitude winds, which globally...

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Emergency plans to counteract global warming by artificially shading the Earth from incoming sunlight might lower the planet’s temperature a few degrees, but such “geoengineering” solutions would...

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Palo Alto, CA—A tiny plant with a long name (Arabidopsis thaliana) helps researchers from over 120 countries learn how to design...

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Baltimore, MD—Scientists working at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Embryology, with colleagues, have overturned previous research that identified critical genes for making muscle stem cells. It turns out that the genes that make muscle stem cells in the...

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Palo Alto, CA— When glaciers advanced over much of the Earth’s surface during the last ice age, what kept the planet from freezing over entirely? This has been a puzzle to climate scientists because leading models have indicated that over the past 24 million...
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Washington, D.C.— The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has awarded the Carnegie Institution a $4 million grant over three years to initiate the Deep Carbon Observatory -- an international, decade-long project to investigate the nature of carbon in Earth's deep interior.

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See the entire summer 2009 CarnegieScience here Summer 2009 newsletter
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Washington, DC—The oil and gas that fuels our homes and cars started out as living organisms that died, were compressed, and heated under heavy layers of sediments...

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Pasadena, CA-The Australian government has announced that it will provide $88.4 million AUD ($72.4 million USD) to help fund the revolutionary 25-meter Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) to be sited at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile’s high-altitude...

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Palo Alto, CA—With the information explosion, it’s remarkable that so little is known about the interactions that proteins have with each other and the protective membrane that surrounds a cell. These interactive, so-called membrane proteins regulate nutrients and...

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Washington, D.C.—Scientist, teacher, and co-director of the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE), Toby Horn, will receive the 2009 Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science...

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Washington, D.C.—On August 24, Moody’s Investors Service affirmed its highest rating—Aaa/VMIG1—on the Carnegie Institution’s Series 1993, 2002, and 2006 bonds.

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Palo Alto, CA—The future of the Earth could rest on potentially dangerous and unproven geoengineering technologies unless emissions of carbon dioxide can be greatly reduced, a new study has found.

The report (published September 1, by the Royal Society, the UK...

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 The Carnegie-founded Mt. Wilson Observatory was home to the most important astronomical discoveries of the 20th century.

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Palo Alto, CA— Christopher Field , director of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology ,* h

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Palo Alto, CA— Director Emeritus of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology, Winslow Briggs, will be awarded the prestigious Interna
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Washington, D.C.—Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have found a way to monitor the strength of geologic faults deep in the Earth. This finding could prove to be a boon for ...

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In a recent interview, scientist and director of Carnegie's Department of Global Ecology, Chris Field, describes the historic shift taking place in the production of...

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Greg Asner peers out an open window, taking stock of the jungle as the single-engine prop plane chugs over a pair of scarlet macaws gliding among the treetops 120 metres below.

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Dust samples collected by high-flying aircraft in the upper atmosphere have yielded an unexpectedly rich trove of relicts from the ancient cosmos, report scientists from the Carnegie Institution. The stratospheric dust includes minute grains that likely formed inside...

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Can global warming be mitigated by a technological fix such as injecting light-blocking particles into the atmosphere or chemically “scrubbing” excess greenhouse gases from the atmosphere?
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Pasadena, CA—Astronomers, conducting the broadest survey to date of galaxies from about 800 million years after the Big Bang, have found 22 early galaxies and confirmed the age of one by its characteristic hydrogen signature at 787 million years...

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Washington, D.C.— Much of our planet’s mineral wealth was deposited billions of years ago when Earth’s chemical cycles were different from today’s. Using geochemical clues from rocks nearly 3 billion years old, a group of...
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Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have found for the first time that high pressure can be used to make a unique hydrogen-storage material. The discovery paves the way for an entirely new way to approach the hydrogen-storage problem. The researchers found that the...
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Photosynthetic organisms need to cope with a wide range of light intensities, which can change over timescales of seconds to minutes. Too much light can damage the photosynthetic machinery and cause cell death. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution were part of a...

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Hawaii may be paradise for vacationers, but for geologists it has long been a puzzle. Plate tectonic theory readily explains the existence of volcanoes at boundaries where plates split apart or collide, but mid-plate volcanoes such as those that built the Hawaiian...

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This image was selected as our holiday card for 2009. It is a portion of AraNet, a gene association network built from over 50 million data points of functional genomics data from the experimental mustard plant Arabidopsis.
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Palo Alto, CA—Tropical forest destruction accounts for some 20% of global greenhouse gas emissions. But quantifying these emissions has not been easy, particularly for tropical nations. New technology, developed by a team of scientists at Carnegie’s...

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Washington, D.C. — Two nearby stars have been found to harbor “super-Earths”― rocky planets larger than the Earth but smaller than ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune. Unlike previously discovered stars with super-Earths, both of the stars are similar to...

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Palo Alto, CA—Scientists at the Carnegie Institution, with colleagues,* have found that a plant steroid prompts two genes to battle each other—one suppresses the other to ensure that leaves grow normally in rice and the experimental...
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Audio Press Release
Global warming is causing climate belts to shift toward the poles and to higher elevations. To keep pace with these changes, the average ecosystem will need to shift about a quarter...

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Pasadena, CA—Astronomers, using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, have broken the distance limit...
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Washington, DC—Former chairman of the Carnegie board of trustees and former chairman of E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company died after a long illness on Sunday, January 3, at his home in Pennsylvania. Heckert was born in Oxford, Ohio, on January 13, 1924.

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Washington, D.C.—Physicists have long wondered whether hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, could be transformed into a metal and possibly even a superconductor—the elusive state in which electrons can flow without resistance. They have speculated that under...

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January 28, 2010

Jenny Graves The Australian National University, Research School of Biological Sciences

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Dr. Richard A. Meserve became the ninth president of the Carnegie Institution in April 2003, after stepping down as Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Meserve had been a member of Carnegie's board of trustees since 1992.

As Chairman of the NRC, Meserve...

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Palo Alto, CA—Scientists have created a new computational model that can be used to predict gene function of uncharacterized plant genes with unprecedented speed and accuracy. The network, dubbed AraNet, has over 19,600 genes associated to each other by over 1 million...
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Washington, D.C.— Carnegie scientists Kenneth Caldeira of the Department of Global Ecology, Yingwei Fei of the Geophysical Laboratory, and Steven Shirey of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism have been elected 2010 Fellows of the American...

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Pasadena, CA— Astronomers have found the first clear evidence of a binary quasar within a pair of actively merging galaxies. Quasars are the extremely bright centers of galaxies surrounding super-massive black holes, and binary quasars are pairs...

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"Above all, we hope readers will come to appreciate that the risks of climate change are not merely academic or theoretical. Pacific Gas and Electric Company is just one company where these challenges aredramatically altering plans for the future. They are driving new multibillion-dollar...

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A newly discovered star outside the Milky Way has yielded important clues about the evolution of our galaxy. Located in the dwarf galaxy Sculptor some 280,000 light-years away, the star has a chemical make-up similar to the Milky Way’s oldest stars, supporting theories that our galaxy...

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A new study by scientists at the Carnegie Institution for Science finds that over a third of carbon dioxide emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in many developed countries are actually emitted outside...
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Metallic glasses are emerging as potentially useful materials at the frontier of materials science research. They combine the advantages and avoid many of the problems of normal metals and glasses, two classes of materials with a very wide range of applications. For example,...
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Palo Alto, CA—To engineer better, more productive crops and develop new drugs to combat disease, scientists look at how the sensor-laden membranes surrounding cells control nutrient and water uptake, secrete toxins, and interact with the environment and neighboring cells...
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Multipotent stem cells have the capacity to develop into different types of cells by reprogramming their DNA to turn on different combinations of genes, a process called “differentiation.” In a new study, researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science have...
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Palo Alto, CAChristopher Field, director of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology, is among the two hundred and twenty-nine leaders in...

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Baltimore, MD—Douglas E. Koshland, staff scientist at Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, has been elected as one of 72 new members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for his excellence in original scientific research. Membership in the NAS is one of the highest honors...

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Baltimore, MD—More than 25 years ago, Dianne Williams of Baltimore was hired by Carnegie’s Department of Embryology to wash lab dishes as part of a city job program for inner city youth. Now as head technician and manager of a Drosophila research lab, and with two...

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Palo Alto, CA— Trees and other plants help keep the planet cool, but rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are turning down this global air conditioner. According to a new study by researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science, in some regions more than...

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Washington, D.C.—An unprecedented study of bald eagle diet, from about 20,000 to 30,000 years ago to the present, will provide wildlife managers with unique information for reintroducing Bald Eagles to the Channel Islands off California. The scientists, including...

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Baltimore, MD— Proteins called cohesins ensure that newly copied chromosomes bind together, separate correctly during cell division, and are repaired efficiently after DNA damage. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have found for the first time that cohesins are needed in different...

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Washington, D.C. — The evolution of complex life forms may have gotten a jump start billions of years ago, when geologic events operating over millions of years caused large quantities of phosphorus to wash into the oceans. According to this model, proposed in a new paper by...

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Washington, D.C. At its annual May meeting, the Carnegie Institution for Science board of trustees enthusiastically endorsed the construction of the proposed Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). The GMT will be the first in the next generation of astronomical observatories that will drive new...

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A team of astronomers including Ivelina Momcheva of the Carnegie Observatories has discovered the most distant cluster of galaxies ever found. In a surprising twist, the young...

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Tiny variations in the isotopic composition of silver in meteorites and Earth rocks are helping scientists put together a timetable of how our planet was assembled beginning 4.568 billion years ago. The new study, published in the journal Science, indicates that water and other key...

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Washington, D.C.—Scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory, with colleagues, have discovered a much higher water content in the Moon’s interior than previous studies. Their research suggests that the water, which is a component of the lunar rocks, was...

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The Green Revolution of the late 20th century increased crop yields worldwide and helped feed an expanding global population. According to a new report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, it also has helped...

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One proposed emergency fix to halt global warming is to seed clouds over the ocean to make them more reflective, reducing the solar radiation absorbed by the Earth. But the scheme could also change global rainfall patterns, raising concerns of water shortages on land. A new study by the...

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Washington, D.C.

Up to now scientists thought that the trace amounts of carbon on the surface of the Moon came from the solar wind. Now researchers at the Carnegie Institution...

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With carbon dioxide in the atmosphere approaching alarming levels, even halting emissions altogether may not be enough to avert catastrophic climate change. Could scrubbing carbon dioxide from the air be a viable solution? A new study by scientists at the Carnegie Institution suggests that while...

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On the inside:

Carbon Emissions "Outsourced" to Developing Countries   p. 5

Bald Eagles:Isotope Analysis Meets Conservation                p. 8

Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph Reveals Earliest Known Galaxy Cluster   p. 12

For Stem Cells, Practice...

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Palo Alto, CA—A tiny, little-understood plant pore has enormous implications for weather forecasting, climate change, agriculture, hydrology, and more. A study by scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology, with colleagues from the Research Center Jülich in Germany,...

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Leonard Searle, astronomer and director emeritus of Carnegie Observatories, died at his home on July 2, 2010, in Pasadena, CA, in the midst of a busy retirement that followed a long, distinguished scientific career.

Searle was born on October 23, 1930, in the London suburb of Mitcham to...

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Analysis of data from MESSENGER’s third and final flyby of Mercury in September 2009 has revealed evidence of younger volcanism on the innermost planet than previously recognized, new information about magnetic substorms, and the first observations of emission from an ionized species in Mercury’...

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The Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) Corporation is pleased to announce that the University of Chicago has joined the partnership that will construct the 25-meter Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), a state of the art astronomical observatory. The GMT will be used to address fundamental...

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Washington, D.C.—Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) staff member Larry Nittler has been elected a fellow of the Meteoritical Society. Society fellows are “members who have...

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Palo Alto, CA—The private sector and an Austrian research institute are chipping in to help support one of the most widely used public biological databases in the world. Although the majority of funding continues to come from the National Science Foundation, The Arabidopsis Information Resource...

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Palo Alto, CA—By 2100 only 18% to 45% of the plants and animals making up ecosystems in global, humid tropical forests may remain as we know them today, according to a new study led by Greg Asner at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology. The research combined new deforestation...

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Scientists have discovered a new window into the Earth's violent past. Geochemical evidence from volcanic rocks collected on Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic suggests that beneath it lies a region of the Earth's mantle that has largely escaped the billions of years of melting and geological...

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Image Link http://www.dtm.ciw.edu/users/sheppard/L5trojan/
Washington, D.C.—There are places in space where the gravitational tug between a planet and the Sun balance out, allowing other smaller bodies to remain...

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With Video
Washington, D.C.—Superconductors can carry electricity without resistance, so they are more efficient than copper wires. However, to attain the superconducting state, these materials have to be cooled below a critical temperature, so-called transition temperature...

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Baltimore, MD—The innovative, educational, outreach program BioEYES has now been adopted by Monash University and the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute. The down-under partnership program debuts this August. BioEYES is designed to foster an interest in...

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Spanish version http://carnegiescience.edu/news/progreso_excepcional_en_el_mapeo_de_carbono

Palo Alto, CA—By integrating satellite mapping, airborne-laser technology, and ground-based plot surveys,...

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Palo Alto, CA—Using sophisticated airborne imaging and structural analysis, scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology mapped more than 40,000 termite mounds over 192 square miles in the African savanna. They found that their size and distribution is linked to...

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Palo Alto, CA- Mediante la integración de mapeo satélital, tecnología láser aerotransportada, y estudios a nivel de parcelas, los científicos de la Institución Carnegie Departamento de Ecología de Global, con colegas del Fondo Mundial para la Naturaleza WWF y en coordinación con el Ministerio...

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Access to the study available through the Steve Davis site

Stanford, CA— Scientists have warned that avoiding dangerous climate change this century will require steep cuts in carbon dioxide emissions. New energy-efficient or carbon-free...

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High  rez image http://carnegiescience.edu/climate_model_results_relative_lowco2_climate

Palo Alto, CA—Scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology have taken...

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Washington, D.C—The Carnegie Institution for Science posted an 11% return on its investments for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2010. As of today, the institution’s endowment stands at approximately $700 million, or 15% above the low experienced in March of 2009.

Carnegie had the...

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Washington, D.C. Astronomers have found a new, potentially habitable Earth-sized planet. It is one of two new planets discovered around the star Gliese 581, some 20 light years away. The planet, Gliese 581g, is located in a “habitable zone”—a distance from the star where the planet receives just...

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Palo Alto, CA—Geologists have found evidence that some 55 million years ago a river as big as the modern Colorado flowed through Arizona into Utah in the opposite direction from the present-day river. Writing in the October issue of the journal Geology, they have named this ancient northeastward...

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LINK TO MOVIES
http://deepgreen.stanford.edu/cell%20imaging%20site%20/html/microtubules.html

Palo Alto, CA— Researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science, with...

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Palo Alto, CA— Director Emeritus of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology, Winslow Briggs,has been elected an Einstein Professor by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The professorship program annually awards 20 distinguished international scientists the honor. The recipients participate in...

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Argonne, ILL—For the first time scientists have been able to watch nanoparticles grow from the earliest stages of their formation. Nanoparticles are the foundation of nanotechnology and their performance depends on their structure, composition, and size. Researchers will now be...

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie biogeochemist Marilyn Fogel, developmental biologist Marnie Halpern, and astronomer Stella Kafka were selected from over 500 applicants to be USA Science & Engineering Festival “Nifty Fifty” lecturers. The first USA Science & Engineering Festival is being held...

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Palo Alto, CA— Scientists have known for some time how important plant steroids called brassinosteroids are for regulating plant growth and development. But until now, they did not know how extensive their reach is. Now researchers, including Yu Sun and Zhi-Yong Wang at Carnegie’s Department of...

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Pasadena, CA— Allan R. Sandage, Edwin Hubble’s former observing assistant and one of the most prominent astronomers of the last century, died November 13, 2010, at home in San Gabriel, California, of pancreatic cancer.

Born in Iowa City, Iowa, June 18, 1926, Sandage grew up to define the...

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Palo Alto, CA— Infestation by bacteria and other pathogens result in global crop losses of over $500 billion annually. A research team led by the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology developed a novel trick for identifying how pathogens hijack plant nutrients to...

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Washington, D.C.—A group at the Geophysical Laboratory (GL) and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM), who share the Broad Branch Road (BBR) campus in Washington, have been recognized by So Others Might Eat (SOME) for serving the “hungry and homeless of Washington for...

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Palo Alto, CA— Plants are very sensitive to light conditions because light is their source of energy and also a signal that activates the special photoreceptors that regulate growth, metabolism, and physiological development. Scientists believe that these light signals control...

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Video Press Release
Washington, D.C.—Scientists from all over the world are taking a second, more expansive, look at the car-sized asteroid that exploded over Sudan's Nubian Desert in 2008....

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Video Press Release
Washington, D.C. — Sophisticated tools allow scientists to subject the basic elements of matter to conditions drastic enough to modify their behavior. By doing this, they can expand our...

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie Observatories director Wendy Freedman has been selected as an AAAS Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The announcement will appear Jan. 11 on the AAAS...

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Some 55% of tropical forests are negatively affected by land use practices and deforestation worldwide. But the ability to penetrate the canopy to see what’s going on has been lacking until now. Global Ecology’s Greg Asner’s group has developed new airborne methods to peer through the canopy to...

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Video Press Release
Stanford, CA— Genghis Khan and his Mongol hordes had an impact on the global carbon cycle as big as today’s annual demand for gasoline. The Black Death, on the other hand, came and...

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Palo Alto, CA— Plant biologists have discovered the last major element of the series of chemical signals that one class of plant hormones, called brassinosteroids, send from a protein on the surface of a plant cell to the cell’s nucleus. Although many steps of the pathway were...

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Pasadena, CA— Astronomers have pushed NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to it limits by finding what they believe to be the most distant object ever seen in the universe—at a distance of 13.2 billion light years, some 3% of the age of universe. This places the object roughly 150 million light years...

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In the 1950s, biochemist Stanley Miller performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that organic compounds could be created under conditions mimicking the primordial Earth.

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Washington, D.C.—Surprising new research shows that, contrary to conventional belief, remains of chitin-protein complex—structural materials containing protein and polysaccharide—are present in abundance in fossils of arthropods from the Paleozoic era. Previously the oldest...

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The Global Ecology team recently completed the airborne phase of a new project to map 35 million acres of tropical forest in the Colombian Amazon. The project seeks to quantify the carbon composition of the underexplored Colombian Amazon, and at the same time, to support Colombia’s environment...

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Washington, D.C.—Chemical compounds called manganites have been studied for many years since the discovery of colossal magnetoresistance, a property that promises important applications in the fields of magnetic sensors, magnetic random access memories and spintronic devices....

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The MESSENGER spacecraft has captured the first portrait of our Solar System from the inside looking out. Comprised of 34 images, the mosaic provides a complement to the Solar System portrait – that one from...

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Washington, D.C.—The U.S. Patent & Trademark Office has issued a patent to the Carnegie Institution for a method of creating high quality diamond crystals larger than 10 carats.

Patent number 7,883,684 was developed by Carnegie ...

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Sean Solomon, Terrestrial Magnetism’s director, is the principal investigator of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, which is sending the first spacecraft to orbit the innermost planet, Mercury. It’s been a long wait. The craft required an...

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See press release from the Applied Physics Laboratory. They built the craft and manage the mission.

MESSENGER Begins Historic Orbit around Mercury

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Washington, D.C.— In the 1950s, biochemist Stanley Miller performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that organic compounds could be created under conditions mimicking the primordial Earth. Some unused samples from Miller’s research were recently uncovered by a team of...

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Washington, D.C.—Recent climate modeling has shown that reducing the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere would give the Earth a wetter climate in the short term. New research from Carnegie Global Ecology scientists Long Cao and Ken Caldeira offers a novel...

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Washington, D.C.—Formaldehyde, a poison and a common molecule throughout the universe, is likely the source of the solar system’s organic carbon solids—abundant in both comets and asteroids. Scientists have long speculated about the how organic, or carbon-containing, material...

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Washington, D.C.–On Monday, April 4, 2011, Tufts University School of Engineering presented Richard A. Meserve, president of the Carnegie Institution and a Tufts University alumnus, the first Vannevar Bush Dean’s Medal. The award includes a commemorative medal and plaque, and a public lecture....

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Washington, D.C. — Although its name may make many people think of flowers, the element germanium is part of a frequently studied group of elements, called IVa, which could have applications for next-generation computer architecture as well as implications for fundamental...

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Palo Alto, CA—Scientists have known for decades that black carbon aerosols add to global warming. These airborne particles made of sooty carbon are believed to be among the largest man-made contributors to global warming because they absorb solar radiation and heat the atmosphere. New research...

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Palo Alto, CA—Brazilians are world leaders in using biofuels for gasoline. About A quarter of their automobile fuel consumption comes from sugarcane, which significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions that otherwise would be emitted from using gasoline. Now scientists from the...

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Washington, D.C.—Paul Butler of Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for his discovery of more than half of the known planets orbiting nearby stars.

212 leaders in science, the arts, social science, the...

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Washington, D.C. Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor of Geology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Linda Elkins-Tanton, will become the seventh director of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM). She succeeds retiring Sean C. Solomon who...

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Washington, D.C. The credit-rating agency Standard & Poor’s (S&P) has reaffirmed the Carnegie Institution for Science’s AA+ long-term rating and stable outlook. It is the second highest rating given by the organization.

S&P’s credit rating provides an independent evaluation...

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Palo Alto, CA— Accurately calculating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the process of producing and bringing products to our doorsteps is nearly impossible, but still a worthwhile effort, two Carnegie researchers claim in a commentary published online this week by ...

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Washington, DC— Scientists have long debated about the origin of carbon in Earth’s oldest sedimentary rocks and how it might signal the remnants of the earliest forms of life on the planet. New research by a team including five scientists from Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory...

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Pasadena, CA- George P. Mitchell, founder of Mitchell Energy & Development Corp. and The Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation, has committed an unprecedented $25-million gift to the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) project. Half of the gift, $12.5 million, has been donated to the Carnegie...

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Carnegie president Richard Meserve has been elected to a three-year term as councillor of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) beginning July 1, 2011. The academy, founded in 1964, is a private, independent, nonprofit organization that provides advice to the federal government on...

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Washington, D.C.—The Moon has much more water than previously thought, a team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Erik Hauri has discovered. Their research, published May 26 in Science Express, shows that...

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Washington, DC— Carbonaceous chondrites are a type of organic-rich meteorite that contain samples of the materials that took part in the creation of our planets nearly 4.6 billion years ago, including materials that were likely formed before our Solar System was created and may...

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Carnegie welcomes four new staff researchers. Anna M. Michalak joins the Department of Global Ecology. Prior to joining Carnegie, she was the Frank and Brooke Transue Faculty Scholar and an associate professor at the University of...

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Launching the next generation Carnegie Airborne Observatory

Thursday, June 2, 2011 —Greg Asner and his team unveiled the latest version of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO-II), an aircraft that combines laser and spectrometer remote sensing technologies, along with high-tech...

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U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu visited Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on Friday, June 3. Russell Hemley, Director of Carnegie's Geophysical Laboratory, presented an overview of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) and led the tour for the delegation, which also...

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Palo Alto, CA— Although scientists have been able to sequence the genomes of many organisms, they still lack a context for associating the proteins encoded in genes with specific biological processes. To better understand the genetics underlying plant physiology and ecology—...

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Washington, D.C.--On March 18, 2011, the MESSENGER spacecraft entered orbit around Mercury to become that planet’s first orbiter. The spacecraft’s instruments are making a complete reconnaissance of the planet’s geochemistry, geophysics, geologic history, atmosphere, magnetosphere, and plasma...

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Washington, D.C.—Glasses differ from crystals. Crystals are organized in repeating patterns that extend in every direction. Glasses lack this strict organization, but do sometimes demonstrate order among neighboring atoms. New research from Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory...

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The Summer 2011 edition of the Carnegie Science newsletter is now available in tablet-friendly format.

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Washington, D.C.—Jewelers abhor diamond impurities, but they are a bonanza for scientists. Safely encased in the super-hard diamond, impurities are unaltered, ancient minerals that can tell the story of Earth’s distant past. Researchers analyzed data from the literature of over 4,000 of these...

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Pasadena, CA— Water really is everywhere. A team of astronomers have found the largest and farthest reservoir of water ever detected in the universe—discovered in the central regions of a distant quasar. Quasars contain massive black holes that are steadily consuming a...

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Palo Alto, CA—Decisions by farmers to plant on productive land with little snow enhances the potential for reforestation to counteract global warming, concludes new research from Carnegie’s Julia Pongratz and Ken Caldeira. Previous research has led scientists and politicians to...

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Washington, D.C.—Geological history has periodically featured giant lava eruptions that coat large swaths of land or ocean floor with basaltic lava, which hardens into rock formations called flood basalt. New research from Matthew Jackson and Richard Carlson proposes that the...

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Baltimore, MD — New research from a team including several Carnegie scientists demonstrates that a specific small segment of RNA could play a key role in the growth of a type of malignant childhood eye tumor called retinoblastoma. The tumor is associated with mutations of a...

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Washington, D.C.—Meteorites hold a record of the chemicals that existed in the early Solar System and that may have been a crucial source of the organic compounds that gave rise to life on Earth. Since the 1960s, scientists have been trying to find proof that nucleobases, the...

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Pasadena, CA— Type Ia supernovae are violent stellar explosions whose brightness is used to determine distances in the universe. Observing these objects to billions of light years away has led to the discovery that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate, the foundation for the notion...

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Washington, DC— Earth’s Moon could be younger than previously thought, according to new research from a team that includes Carnegie’s Richard Carlson and former-Carnegie fellow Maud Boyet. Their work will be published online in Nature on August 17.

The...

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Palo Alto, CA—Plant biologists have been working for years to nail down the series of chemical signals that one class of plant hormones, called brassinosteroids, send from a protein on the surface of a plant cell to the cell’s nucleus. New research from Carnegie scientists Tae-...

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Pasadena, CA— A team of scientists, led by Michael Rauch from the Carnegie Observatories, has discovered a distant galaxy that may help elucidate two fundamental questions of galaxy formation: How galaxies take in matter and how they give off energetic radiation. Their work will...

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Baltimore, MD— The human genome shares several peculiarities with the DNA of just about every other plant and animal. Our genetic blueprint contains numerous entities known as transposons, or “jumping genes,” which have the ability to move from place to place on the chromosomes...

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory’s newest staff member, Timothy Strobel, will be given the prestigious Jamieson Award on September 26, 2011, from the International Association for the Advancement of High Pressure Science and Technology in Mumbai, India. The Jamieson Award is...

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Washington, D.C.—Scientists have speculated for some time that the Earth’s carbon cycle extends deep into the planet’s interior, but until now there has been no direct evidence. The mantle–Earth’s thickest layer –is largely inaccessible. A team of researchers analyzed diamonds...

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Washington, D.C. — A planet with two suns may be a familiar sight to fans of the Star Wars film series, but not, until now, to scientists. A team of researchers, including Carnegie’s Alan Boss, has discovered a planet that orbits around a pair of stars. Their remarkable...

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Washington, D.C.—Only six months into its Mercury orbit, the tiny MESSENGER spacecraft has shown scientists that Mercury doesn’t conform to theory. Its surface material composition differs in important ways from both those of the other terrestrial planets and expectations prior to the MESSENGER...

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WASHINGTON, D.C.– The world's largest celebration of science and engineering, the USA Science & Engineering Festival, will return to Washington, D.C., April 27-29, 2012. For the second year, the Carnegie Institution for Science will participate with hands-on experiments. At Carnegie's booth...

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Baltimore, MD—Staff associate Christoph Lepper, at Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, is one of 10 recipients of the NIH Director’s Early Independence Awards. This is the first year of the awards. Lepper will receive a prize of $250,000 per year for five years to carry out his creative...

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Washington, D.C. — Carbon is the fourth-most-abundant element in the universe and takes on a wide variety of forms, called allotropes, including diamond and graphite. Scientists at Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory are part of a team that has discovered a new form of carbon,...

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Washington, D.C. — It is difficult to measure accurately each nation’s contribution of carbon dioxide to the Earth’s atmosphere. Carbon is extracted out of the ground as coal, gas, and oil, and these fuels are often exported to other countries where they are burned to generate...

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Washington, DC — Solar radiation management is a class of theoretical concepts for manipulating the climate in order to reduce the risks of global warming caused by greenhouse gasses. But its potential effectiveness and risks are uncertain, and it is unclear whether tests could...

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What’s up with the Moon? Carnegie scientists have made some surprising discoveries that are revamping what we thought we knew about our closest celestial neighbor. Find out about that and what diamonds have uncovered about the evolution of Earth. You’ll also learn about a microRNA that could be...

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Pasadena, CA-Join a discussion with leading astronomers about how one of the world’s largest telescopes, the Giant Magellan Telescope, will help solve some of the most vexing problems in astronomy today—from the nature of dark energy and dark matter to finding signatures of life on other planets...

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Palo Alto, CA—U.S. scientists have developed a new, integrated, ten-year science plan to better understand the details of Earth’s carbon cycle and people’s role in it. Understanding the carbon cycle is central for mitigating climate change and developing a sustainable future. The plan builds on...

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Baltimore, MD—Carnegie’s educational outreach program, BioEYES, has joined forces with General Motors (GM), and Earth Force to take Walter P. Carter Elementary/Middle School students on a knee-deep watershed lesson on December 1, 2011. The group will monitor water quality, sample aquatic insects...

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Palo Alto, CA--The four largest nonprofit plant science research institutions in the U.S. have joined forces to form the Association of Independent Plant Research Institutes (AIPI) in an effort to target plant science research to meet the profound challenges facing society in a more coordinated...

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Washington, D.C. — The composition of the Earth’s core remains a mystery. Scientists know that the liquid outer core consists mainly of iron, but it is believed that small amounts of some other elements are present as well. Oxygen is the most abundant element in the planet, so...

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Baltimore, MD — Scientists have long held theories about the importance of proteins called B-type lamins in the process of embryonic stem cells replicating and differentiating into different varieties of cells. New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Yixian Zheng indicates...

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Washington, D.C. — NASA’s Kepler Mission has discovered the first super-Earth orbiting in the habitable zone of a star similar to the Sun. A team of researchers, including Carnegie’s Alan Boss, has discovered what could be a large, rocky planet with a surface temperature of...

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Palo Alto, CA — Food prices are soaring at the same time as the Earth’s population is nearing 9 billion. As a result the need for increased crop yields is extremely important. New research led by Carnegie’s Wolf Frommer into the system by which sugars are moved throughout a...

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Stanford, CA— Over the past 10 years, the death of forest trees due to drought and increased temperatures has been documented on all continents except Antarctica. This can in turn drive global warming by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere by trees...

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Pasadena, CA— A team of scientists, including Carnegie’s Mansi M. Kasliwal, has observed the early stages of a Type Ia supernova that is only 21 million light years away from Earth--the closest of its kind discovered in 25 years. The Palomar Transient Factory team’s detection of...

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Washington, D.C.—The crushing pressures and intense temperatures in Earth’s deep interior squeeze atoms and electrons so closely together that they interact very differently. With depth materials change. New experiments and supercomputer computations discovered that iron oxide undergoes a new...

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Stanford, CA— Plant roots are fascinating plant organs – they not only anchor the plant, but are also the world’s most efficient mining companies. Roots live in darkness and direct the activities of the other organs, as well as interact with the surrounding environment. Charles...

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Washington, D.C. — Coral reefs are extremely diverse ecosystems that support enormous biodiversity. But they are at risk. Carbon dioxide emissions are acidifying the ocean, threatening reefs and other marine organisms. New research led by Carnegie’s Kenneth Schneider analyzed...

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Carnegie Institution for Science president Richard A. Meserve was elected a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He was elected in the section covering the fields of radiation safety, energy development, and environmental protection. The Russian Academy has approximately 250...

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Washington, D.C. — Around 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian geologic period, there was a mass extinction so severe that it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth’s history. Although the cause of this event is a mystery, it has been speculated...

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Washington, D.C.—On January 14, 2012, the second 8.4-meter (27.6 ft) diameter mirror for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will be cast inside a rotating furnace at the University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML) underneath the campus football stadium. The Mirror Lab will host...

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Baltimore, MD—Carnegie’s educational outreach program, BioEYES, will be the recipient of the 2012 Viktor Hamburger Outstanding Educator Prize from the Society for Developmental Biology. BioEYES founders Steve Farber and Jamie Shuda (University of Pennsylvania),...

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Washington, D.C. — Carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of coal, oil, and gas have been increasing over the past decades, causing the Earth to get hotter and hotter. There are concerns that a continuation of these trends could have catastrophic effects, including crop...

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Former staff member Roy Britten died January 21 at the age of 92. He joined DTM in 1951 as a member of the biophysics group. In 1971 he began his association with Caltech as a research associate

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Washington, D.C.— An international team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Guillem Anglada-Escudé and Paul Butler has discovered a potentially habitable super-Earth orbiting a nearby star. The star is a member of a triple star system and has a different makeup than our Sun, being...

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Stanford, CA— Plant's leaves are sealed with a gas-tight wax layer to prevent water loss. Plants breathe through microscopic pores called stomata (Greek for mouths) on the surfaces of leaves. Over 40% of the carbon dioxide, CO2, in the atmosphere passes through stomata each year...

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Washington, D.C.—The Federation of American Scientists presented Richard A. Meserve, the Carnegie Institution president, with the inaugural 2011 Richard L. Garwin Award on February 8, for “his distinguished service and...

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Washington, D.C.—By combining airborne laser technology, satellite mapping, and ground-based plot surveys, a team of researchers has produced the first large-scale, high-resolution estimates of carbon stocks in remote and fragile Madagascar. The group has shown that it is possible to map carbon...

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Pasadena, CA— Eta Carinae, one of the most massive stars in our Milky Way galaxy, unexpectedly increased in brightness in the 19th century. For ten years in the mid-1800s it was the second-brightest star in the sky. (Now it is not even in the top 100.) The increase in luminosity...

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Washington, D.C.— Could replacing coal-fired electricity plants with generators fueled by natural gas bring global warming to a halt in this century? What about rapid construction of massive numbers of solar or wind farms, hydroelectric dams, or nuclear reactors—or the invention...

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Stanford, CA— Along with photosynthesis, the plant cell wall is one of the features that most set plants apart from animals. A structural molecule called cellulose is necessary for the manufacture of these walls. Cellulose is synthesized in a semi-crystalline state that is...

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Washington, D.C. — Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity—maintain a flow of electrons—without any resistance. This phenomenon can only be found in certain materials at low temperatures, or can be induced under chemical and high...

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Stanford, CA—The major difference between plant and animal cells is the photosynthetic process, which converts light energy into chemical energy. When light isn’t available, energy is generated by breaking down carbohydrates and sugars, just as it is in animal and some bacterial...

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Washington, D.C.— Seawater circulation pumps hydrogen and boron into the oceanic plates that make up the seafloor, and some of this seawater remains trapped as the plates descend into the mantle at areas called subduction zones. By analyzing samples of submarine volcanic glass...

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Washington, D.C. — The Carnegie Institution for Science today announced that the complete archive of the Carnegie Year Book--the annual report of scientific research, published continuously since 1902--has been digitized and is now available online.
 
The...

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Washington, D.C. — Plant science is key to addressing the major challenges facing humanity in the 21st Century, according to Carnegie’s David Ehrhardt and Wolf Frommer. In a Perspective published in The Plant Cell, the two researchers argue that the development of new...

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Pasadena, CA--A team of astronomers has discovered the most distant cluster of red galaxies ever observed using FourStar, a new and powerful near-infrared camera on the 6.5m Magellan Baade Telescope. The galaxy cluster is located 10.5 billion light years away in the direction of...

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Washington, D.C.—The Carnegie Institution for Science received the highest rating for sound fiscal management—four stars—from Charity Navigator for the eleventh consecutive year. Only eight organizations out of 5,500 have received the highest rating this long. The Carnegie Institution for...

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Washington, D.C.—On March 17, the tiny MESSENGER spacecraft completed its primary mission to orbit and observe the planet Mercury for one Earth-year. The bounty of surprises from the mission has completely altered our understanding of the solar system’s innermost planet. As reported in one of...

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Washington, D.C. — Scientists have long speculated about why there is a large change in the strength of rocks that lie at the boundary between two layers immediately under Earth’s crust: the lithosphere and underlying asthenosphere. Understanding this boundary is central to our...

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Pasadena, CA--Astronomers have begun to blast 3 million cubic feet of rock from a mountaintop in the Chilean Andes to make room for what will be the world’s largest telescope when completed near the end of the decade. The telescope will be located at the Carnegie Institution’s Las Campanas...

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On Friday, March 23, the first blast (Big Bang Event) occurred at Las Campanas Peak in Chile, at high noon US Eastern Daylight Time. It marked the beginning of mountain leveling and site preparation for the Giant Magellan Telescope.

 

The Giant Magellan Telescope will be one of the...

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie staff scientist Greg Asner has been selected as one of 22 experts to serve the U.S. government as part of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA) through the Senior ECPA Fellows Program. The program will send 22 experts from the academic, non-profit,...

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Stanford, CA — The Plant Metabolic Network (http://www.plantcyc.org/), which is based at Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology, has launched four new online databases that offer an unprecedented view of the biochemical pathways controlling the metabolism...

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Pasadena, CA – The board of directors of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) has informed the National Science Foundation (NSF) that they will not participate in an upcoming funding opportunity. The partners in the project feel that they are making such rapid progress that they have...

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Find out the latest about potentially habitable planets around other stars. Learn about a new type of carbon that could give diamonds a run for their money.

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Washington, D.C. — How hydrogen--the most abundant element in the cosmos--responds to extremes of pressure and temperature is one of the major challenges in modern physical science. Moreover, knowledge gleaned from experiments using hydrogen as a testing ground on the nature of...

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Washington, D.C.—The American Society for Plant Biology (ASPB) awarded Wolf B. Frommer, director of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology, the Lawrence Bogorad Award for Excellence in Plant Biology Research for “his major contributions in the development of fundamental tools and technologies...

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Washington, D.C.— Carnegie Institution for Science president Richard A. Meserve has been elected president of the Harvard Board of Overseers for 2012-2013. The Overseers provide advice and approvals of important actions about educational policies and practices.

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Pasadena, CA—The Big Bang produced lots of hydrogen and helium and a smidgen of lithium. All heavier elements found on the periodic table have been produced by stars over the last 13.7 billion years. Astronomers analyze starlight to determine the chemical makeup of stars, the origin of the...

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Washington, D.C—Geochemist Richard Carlson of Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). He is among 84 new members and 21 foreign associates of one the most prestigious...

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Baltimore, MD — Insect glands are responsible for producing a host of secretions that allow bees to sting and ants to lay down trails to and from their nests. New research from Carnegie scientists focuses on secretions from glands in the reproductive tract that help sperm...

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Pasadena, CA—Type Ia supernovae are important stellar phenomena, used to measure the expansion of the universe. But astronomers know embarrassingly little about the stars they come from and how the explosions happen. New research from a team led by Harvard University and...

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Washington, D.C.— In the search for Earth-like planets, it is helpful to look for clues and patterns that can help scientist narrow down the types of systems where potentially habitable planets are likely to be discovered. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Alan Boss...

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Washington, D.C. Carnegie’s Larry Nittler of Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism has been appointed deputy principal investigator of the MESSENGER mission to Mercury. Principal...

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Nuclear Energy Institute FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:202.739.8000
For Release:May 22, 2012
Richard Meserve Receives Nuclear Energy Industry's Leadership Award
CHARLOTTE, N.C.—Carnegie Institution President Richard Meserve, respected as one of the world’...

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Washington, DC — Molecules containing large chains of carbon and hydrogen--the building blocks of all life on Earth--have been the targets of missions to Mars from Viking to the present day. While these molecules have previously been found in meteorites from Mars, scientists...

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Washington, D.C. — One idea for fighting global warming is to increase the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere, scattering incoming solar energy away from the Earth’s surface. But scientists theorize that this solar geoengineering could have a side effect of whitening the sky...

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ASP Press Release
Astronomical Society of the Pacific Honors Dr. Sandra Moore Faber with Prestigious Bruce Gold Medal Award
 
May 30, 2012
The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), one of the oldest and most respected astronomy societies in...

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Stanford, CA—The scientific community needs to make a 10-year, $100 billion investment in food and energy security, says Carnegie’s Wolf Frommer and Tom Brutnell of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in an opinion piece published in the June issue of...

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Washington, D.C.—Until now, Earth was the only planet known to have vast reservoirs of water in its interior. Scientists analyzed the water content of two Martian meteorites originating from inside the Red Planet. They found that the amount of water in places of the Martian mantle is vastly...

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Washington, D.C. — Mineral evolution posits that Earth’s near-surface mineral diversity gradually increased through an array of chemical and biological processes. A dozen different species in interstellar dust particles that formed the solar system have evolved to more than 4500...

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Washington, D.C.—Although there have been about 800 extra-solar planets discovered so far in our galaxy, the precise masses of the majority of them are still unknown, as the most-common planet-finding technique provides only a general idea of an object’s mass. Previously, the...

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Baltimore, MD — In mammals, most lipids (such as fatty acids and cholesterol) are absorbed into the body via the small intestine. The complexity of the cells and fluids that inhabit this organ make it very difficult to study in a laboratory setting. New research from Carnegie’s...

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Washington, D.C.— When evaluating the historic contributions made by different countries to the greenhouse gasses found in Earth’s atmosphere, calculations generally go back no further than the year 1840. New research from Carnegie’s Julia Pongratz and Ken Caldeira shows that...

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Washington, DC —Scientists have long believed that comets and, or a type of very primitive meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites were the sources of early Earth's volatile elements—which include hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon—and possibly organic material, too. Understanding...

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Stanford, CA —Light is not only the source of a plant’s energy, but also an environmental signal that instructs the growth behavior of plants. As a result, a plant’s sensitivity to light is of great interest to scientists and their research on this issue could help improve crop...

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Washington, D.C. — In order to understand Earth's earliest history--its formation from Solar System material into the present-day layering of metal core and mantle, and crust--scientists look to meteorites. New research from a team including Carnegie's Doug Rumble and Liping Qin...

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Washington, D.C.— Comets and asteroids preserve the building blocks of our Solar System and should help explain its origin. But there are unsolved puzzles. For example, how did icy comets obtain particles that formed at high temperatures, and how did these refractory particles acquire rims with...

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Washington, D.C.—Using new, highly efficient techniques, Carnegie and Colombian scientists have developed accurate high-resolution maps of the carbon stocks locked in tropical vegetation for 40% of the Colombian Amazon (165,000 square kilometers/64,000 square miles), an area about four times the...

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Washington, D.C. — For decades it has been thought that a shock wave from a supernova explosion triggered the formation of our Solar System. According to this theory, the shock wave also injected material from the exploding star into a cloud of dust and gas, and the newly...

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Washington, D.C.—Type Ia supernovae are violent stellar explosions. Observations of their brightness are used to determine distances in the universe and have shown scientists that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. But there is still too little known about the...

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Washington, D.C. – For years, scientists have debated how big a role elephants play in toppling trees in South African savannas. Tree loss is a natural process, but it is increasing in some regions, with cascading effects on the habitat for many other species. Using high resolution 3-D mapping,...

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Baltimore, MD — The study of muscular system protein myostatin has been of great interest to researchers as a potential therapeutic target for people with muscular disorders. Although much is known about how myostatin affects muscle growth, there has been disagreement about what...

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Washington, D.C. — A team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Lin Wang has observed a new form of very hard carbon clusters, which are unusual in their mix of crystalline and disordered structure. The material is capable of indenting diamond. This finding has potential applications...

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie scientists are the first to discover the conditions under which nickel oxide can turn into an electricity-conducting metal. Nickel oxide is one of the first compounds to be studied for its electronic properties, but until now scientists have not been able to induce a...

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Baltimore, MD—Director Emeritus Donald Brown, of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, receives the prestigious 2012 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science “For exceptional leadership and citizenship in biomedical science–exemplified by fundamental discoveries concerning the...

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Washington, D.C.— There is enough energy available in winds to meet all of the world’s demand. Airbourne wind turbines that convert steadier and faster high-altitude winds into energy could generate even more power than ground- and ocean-based units. New research from Carnegie’s...

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Washington, D.C.— Over the past two decades, extensive forest death triggered by hot and dry climatic conditions has been documented on every continent except Antarctica. Forest mortality due to drought and heat stress is expected to increase due to climate change. Although...

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Baltimore, MD —You may think you have dinner all to yourself, but you’re actually sharing it with a vast community of microbes waiting within your digestive tract. A new study from a team including Carnegie’s Steve Farber and Juliana Carten reveals that some gut microbes...

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Senior trustee and retired Goddard Space Flight Center astronomer Jaylee Mead died September 14 at the age of 83 from congestive heart failure. Mead joined the Carnegie board in 1999 and she and her husband Gilbert, a geophysicist, were members of the Hubble Society. In addition to her many...

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Pasadena, CA— With the combined power of NASA's Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes, as well as a cosmic magnification effect, a team of astronomers, including Carnegie’s Daniel Kelson, have spotted what could be the most distant galaxy ever seen. Light from the young galaxy...

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Watch the Carnegie Airborne Observatory in action mapping the biomass and biodiversity in the Amazon.

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Pasadena, CA— A team of astronomers, led by Wendy Freedman, director of the Carnegie Observatories, have used NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to make one of the most accurate and precise measurement yet of the Hubble...

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Washington, D.C.—The Carnegie Institution for Science and the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) have been granted United States Patent 8,283,329, entitled, “Genetic inhibition of double-stranded RNA.” The patent, issued on October 9, 2012, is broadly directed to the use of RNA...

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Washington, D.C.— Solar radiation management is a type of geoengineering that would manipulate the climate in order to reduce the impact of global warming caused by greenhouse gasses. Ideas include increasing the amount of aerosols in the stratosphere, which could scatter...

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Washington, D.C.--Scientists with the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization have completed the most challenging large astronomical mirror ever made. The mirror will be part of the 25-meter Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), which will explore planets around other stars and the formation of stars,...

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Baltimore, MD— The ability of embryonic stem cells to differentiate into different types of cells with different functions is regulated and maintained by a complex series of chemical interactions, which are not well understood. Learning more about this process could prove useful...

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Washington, DC—The Carnegie Institution announced today that it is a grant recipient of the Grand Challenges Explorations initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Wolf B. Frommer, director of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology, jointly with Bing Yang from Iowa State...

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Link for image and caption http://carnegiescience.edu/prcohenelectrotcpic101612

 

Washington, D.C.--Researchers at the Carnegie Institution have discovered a new efficient way to pump heat using crystals. The...

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Washington, D.C.—Astronomers have discovered a new super-Earth in the habitable zone, where liquid water and a stable atmosphere could reside, around the nearby star HD 40307. It is one of three new super-Earths found around the star that has three other low-mass planets orbiting it. See video...

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Pasadena, CA— A team of astronomers including Carnegie’s Daniel Kelson have set a new distance record for finding the farthest galaxy yet seen in the universe. By combining the power of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and one of nature's own natural "zoom...

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Washington, DC — A team of scientists, including Carnegie's Conel Alexander and Jianhua Wang, studied the hydrogen in water from the Martian interior and found that Mars formed from similar building blocks to that of Earth, but that there were differences in the later evolution...

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Washington, D.C.— The mantles of Earth and other rocky planets are rich in magnesium and oxygen. Due to its simplicity, the mineral magnesium oxide is a good model for studying the nature of planetary interiors. New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Stewart McWilliams studied...

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Washington, D.C. — Oceanic crust covers two-thirds of the Earth’s solid surface, but scientists still don’t entirely understand the process by which it is made. Analysis of more than 600 samples of oceanic crust by a team including Carnegie’s Frances Jenner reveals a systemic...

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Stanford, CA — Plants grow upward from a tip of undifferentiated tissue called the shoot apical meristem. As the tip extends, stem cells at the center of the meristem divide and increase in numbers. But the cells on the periphery differentiate to form plant organs, such as...

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San Francisco, CA —Researchers from the Carnegie Institution are rolling out results from the new Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System, or AToMS, for the first time at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meetings in San Francisco. The groundbreaking technology and its scientific observations are...

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Washington, D.C.—The Carnegie Institution for Science received the highest rating for sound fiscal management and commitment to accountability and transparency—four stars—from Charity Navigator for the twelfth consecutive year. Charity Navigator is America's largest charity evaluator. Only five...

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The Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) is a revolutionary advancement in remote sensing and 3-D analysis of ecosystem composition, chemistry, and physiology.

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Clathrate Snowflake -- Image credit: Timothy Strobel, Carnegie Institution for Science, Geophysical Laboratory

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Washington, D.C. — When materials are stressed, they eventually change shape. Initially these changes are elastic, and reverse when the stress is relieved. When the material’s strength is exceeded, the changes become permanent. This could result in the material breaking or...

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Washington, D.C.— An international team of scientists, including Carnegie’s Paul Butler, has discovered that Tau Ceti, one of the closest and most Sun-like stars, may have five planets. Their work is published by Astronomy & Astrophysics and is available...

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Washington, D.C.—After extensive analyses by a team of scientists led by Carl Agee at the University of New Mexico, researchers have identified a new class of Martian meteorite that likely originated from Mars’s crust. It is also the only meteoritic sample dated to 2.1 billion years ago, the...

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Washington, D.C.— In 2004 a very popular study aimed to address climate change by deploying wedges of different existing energy technologies or approaches. According to the study by Robert Socolow and Stephen Pacala, each wedge would avoid one billion tons of carbon (1 GtC)...

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Washington, D.C.—Richard A. Meserve, the president of the Carnegie Institution, has been invited to be an “international adviser” to the Japanese Nuclear Regulatory Authority (JNRA). As a result of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the Japanese government established the JNRA in order to provide...

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Washington, D.C.— Researchers still have much to learn about the volcanism that shaped our planet’s early history. New evidence from a team led by Carnegie’s Frances Jenner demonstrates that some of the tectonic processes driving volcanic activity, such as those taking place...

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Washington, D.C. —Until now it has not been clear how salt, a scourge to agriculture, halts the growth of the plant-root system. A team of researchers, led by the Carnegie Institution’s José Dinneny and Lina Duan, found that not all...

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The American Physical Society's Historic Sites Committee has selected the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism a historic site for the pioneering research conducted by Vera Rubin and Kent Ford on dark matter.

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Pasadena, CA—Type II supernovae are formed when massive stars collapse, initiating giant explosions. It is thought that stars emit a burst of mass as a precursor to the supernova explosion. If this process were better understood, it could be used to predict and study...

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Washington, DC—A team of scientists, led by researchers at Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology, has determined that the recent widespread die-off of Colorado trembling aspen trees is a direct result of decreased precipitation exacerbated by high summer temperatures. The die-off, triggered by...

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Washington, D.C.—Solar geoengineering is a proposed approach to reduce the effects of climate change due to greenhouse gasses by deflecting some of the sun’s incoming radiation.

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Washington, D.C.—Solar geoengineering is a proposed approach to reduce the effects of climate change due to greenhouse gasses by deflecting some of the sun’s incoming radiation. This type of proposed solution carries with it a number of uncertainties, however, including...

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Washington, D.C.— Mineral evolution is a new way to look at our planet’s history. It’s the study of the increasing diversity and characteristics of Earth’s near-surface minerals, from the dozen that arrived on interstellar dust particles when the Solar System was formed to the...

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Washington, D.C.—New theoretical modeling by Carnegie’s Alan Boss provides clues to how the gas giant planets in our solar system—Jupiter and Saturn—might have formed and evolved. His work was published recently by The Astrophysical Journal.

 

New stars...

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Pasadena, CA— A team of astronomers including Carnegie’s Ian Thompson have managed to improve the measurement of the distance to our nearest neighbor galaxy and, in the process, refine an astronomical calculation that helps measure the expansion of the universe. Their work is...

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Pasadena, CA—For only the second time in history, a team of scientists--including Carnegie's Michele Fumagalli--have discovered an extremely rare triple quasar system. Their work is published by Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. It is available online...

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Pasadena, CA — Using information gathered from several telescopes, a team of astronomers, including Carnegie’s Eric Murphy, searched the sky for very rarely seen dusty starburst galaxies, formed soon after the Big Bang. These galaxies are characterized by an unusually high rate...

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Valdivia, Chile, and Washington, D.C.—Cancer cells break down sugars and produce the metabolic acid lactate at a much higher rate than normal cells. This phenomenon provides a telltale sign that cancer is present, via diagnostics such as PET scans, and possibly offers an avenue...

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Washington, D.C.— It has long been believed that male lions are dependent on females when it comes to hunting. But new evidence suggests that male lions are, in fact, very successful hunters in their own right. A new report from a team including Carnegie's Scott Loarie and Greg...

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Pasadena, CA— Supernovae were always thought to occur in two main varieties. But a team of astronomers including Carnegie’s Wendy Freedman, Mark Phillips and Eric Persson is reporting the discovery of a new type of supernova called Type Iax. This research has been accepted for...

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Click here for the spring CarnegieScience

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Washington, D.C.—A research team, led by Carnegie’s Anna Michalak, has determined that the 2011 record-breaking algal bloom in Lake Erie was triggered by long-term agricultural practices coupled with extreme precipitation, followed by weak lake circulation and warm temperatures. The team also...

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Washington, D.C.— Carnegie scientists have found that the plant species making up an ecosystem are better predictors of ecosystem chemistry than environmental conditions such as terrain, geology, or altitude. This is the first study using a new, high-resolution airborne, chemical-detecting...

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Washington, D.C.— A team of researchers has made a major breakthrough in measuring the structure of nanomaterials under extremely high pressures. For the first time, they developed a way to get around the severe distortions of high-energy X-ray beams that are used to image the structure of a...

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Baltimore, MD--Recent research shows that natural experiences in childhood boost creativity, stimulate learning, and improve behavior and health. Carnegie’s BioEYES educational program, in partnership with General Motors (GM), is capitalizing on this by...

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Baltimore, MD— Eggs take a long time to produce in the ovary, and thus are one of a body’s precious resources. It has been theorized that the body has mechanisms to help the ovary ensure that ovulated eggs enter the reproductive tract at the right time in order to maximize the...

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Washington, D.C.—A team of scientists, including Carnegie’s Alan Boss, has discovered two Earth-like planets in the habitable orbit of a Sun-like star. Their work is published in Science Express.

 

Using observations gathered by NASA’s Kepler Mission, the...

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Pasadena, CA— Blazars are the brightest of active galactic nuclei, and many emit very high-energy gamma rays. New observations of a blazar known as PKS 1424+240 show that it is the most-distant known source of very high-energy gamma rays. But its emission spectrum appears highly...

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Washington, D.C.— Scientists have long believed that lava erupted from certain oceanic volcanoes contains materials from the early Earth’s crust. But decisive evidence for this phenomenon has proven elusive. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Erik Hauri demonstrates...

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Washington, D.C.—Forecasting volcanic eruptions with success is heavily dependent on recognizing well-established patterns of pre-eruption unrest in the monitoring data. But in order to develop better monitoring procedures, it is also crucial to understand volcanic eruptions...

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Baltimore, MD—Mammalian females ovulate periodically over their reproductive lifetimes, placing significant demands on their ovaries for egg production. Whether mammals generate new eggs in adulthood using stem cells has been a source of scientific controversy. If true, these “...

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie staff scientist Greg Asner has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. He is one of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates from 14 countries elected “in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.” The total number of...

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Stanford, CA— An international team of 12 leading plant biologists, including Carnegie’s Wolf Frommer, say their discoveries could have profound implications for increasing the supply of food and energy for our rapidly growing global population. All of their work focuses on the...

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Washington, D.C.— Lyman Thomas Aldrich, 95, who worked as a geophysicist and geochemist at the Carnegie Institution for Science’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) for 34 years, including a stint as its acting director, died Wednesday, May 1, at a retirement community in...

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Washington, D.C.— Water is perhaps the most important molecule in our solar system. Figuring out where it came from and how it was distributed within and among the planets can help scientists understand how planets formed and evolved. New research from a team including Carnegie’...

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Washington, D.C.—President of the Carnegie Institution, Richard A. Meserve, was awarded the 2013 Henry DeWolf Smyth Nuclear Statesman Award by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and the Nuclear Energy Institute in Washington, D.C., on May 14, 2013.
 
Vice-president Donald Hoffman of...

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Washington, D.C.--Christopher Field, the founding director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology, has been elected to the Harvard Board of Overseers. Field, who received his bachelors in biology from Harvard in 1975, has been a pioneer in developing new approaches to understand the large-...

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Washington, D.C.—Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. The way it responds under extreme pressures and temperatures is crucial to our understanding of matter and the nature of hydrogen-rich planets.

 

New work from Carnegie scientists using intense...

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Washington, D.C.—The Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) was awarded a grant to run two special career exploration programs for students who attend public schools in the District of Columbia. The program is called SciLife™-DC. On Monday, June 17 at 1:00 PM, CASE will host the...

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Washington, D.C.—Using revolutionary new techniques, a team led by Carnegie’s Malcolm Guthrie has made a striking discovery about how ice behaves under pressure, changing ideas that date back almost 50 years. Their findings could alter our understanding of how the water molecule...

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Washington, D.C.—A team of researchers has discovered evidence that an extrasolar planet may be forming quite far from its star—about twice the distance Pluto is from our Sun. The planet lies inside a dusty, gaseous disk around a small red dwarf TW Hydrae, which is only about 55% of the mass of...

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Stanford, CA—Cereals are grasses that produce grains, the bulk of our food supply. Carnegie’s Plant Biology Department is releasing genome-wide metabolic complements of several cereals including rice, barley, sorghum, and millet. Along with corn, whose metabolic complement was...

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Washington, D.C.—A team of astronomers, including Carnegie’s Paul Butler, has combined new observations with existing data to reveal a solar system packed full of planets. The star Gliese 667C is orbited by between five and seven planets, the maximum number that could fit in...

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Washington, D.C.—To prevent coral reefs around the world from dying off, deep cuts in carbon dioxide emissions are required, says a new study from Carnegie’s Katharine Ricke and Ken Caldeira. They find that all existing coral reefs will be engulfed in inhospitable ocean...

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Washington, D.C.—Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity—maintain a flow of electrons—without any resistance. This phenomenon can only be found in certain materials under specific low-temperature and high-pressure conditions....

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Stanford, CA—Transport proteins are responsible for moving materials such as nutrients and metabolic products through a cell’s outer membrane, which seals and protects all living cells, to the cell’s interior. These transported molecules include sugars, which can be used to fuel...

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Washington, D.C.--Christopher Field, the founding director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology has been awarded one of Germany’s most prestigious prizes, the Max Planck Research Prize with Markus Reichstein “because they have significantly increased our knowledge of how life on Earth...

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Baltimore, MD—Proper tissue function and regeneration is supported by stem cells, which reside in so-called niches. New work from Carnegie’s Yixian Zheng and Haiyang Chen identifies an important component for...

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Washington, DC—A study published in the July 17, issue of the journal PLOS ONE found that more than 80% of tropical forests in Malaysian Borneo have been heavily impacted by logging.
 
The Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak were already thought to be global hotspots of forest loss...

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Washington, D.C—Carnegie geochemist Richard Carlson has been awarded the prestigious Arthur L. Day Medal from the Geological Society of America (GSA) for “outstanding distinction in contributing to geologic knowledge through the application of physics and chemistry to the solution of geologic...

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Watch the Carnegie Airborne Observatory make the world's highest resolution carbon map of a country (Panama) in less than one minute

 

Washington, DC—A team of researchers has for the first time mapped the above ground carbon...

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Washington, D.C.—Comets and meteorites contain clues to our solar system's earliest days. But some of the findings are puzzle pieces that don't seem to fit well together. A new set of theoretical models from...

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Washington, D.C.— Hydrogen is deceptively simple. It has only a single electron per atom, but it powers the sun and forms the majority of the observed universe. As such, it is naturally exposed to the entire range of pressures and temperatures available in the whole cosmos. But...

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Washington, DC—Researchers reviewed the likelihood of continued changes to the terrestrial climate, including an analysis of a collection of 27 climate models. If emissions of heat-trapping gases continue along the recent trajectory, 21st century mean annual global warming could exceed 3.6 °F (...

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Washington, D.C—The key to understanding Earth’s evolution is to look at how heat is conducted in the deep lower mantle—a region some 400 to 1,800 miles (660 to 2,900 kilometers) below the surface. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, with colleagues at the University of Illinois, have for...

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Pasadena, CA— A team of astronomers from three institutions has developed a new type of telescope camera that makes higher resolution images than ever before, the culmination of 20 years of effort. The team has been developing this technology at telescope observatories in...

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Baltimore, MD--Cells in the body wear down over time and die. In many organs, like the small intestine, adult stem cells play a vital role in maintaining function by replacing old cells with new ones. Learning about the nature of tissue stem cells can help scientists understand...

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Washington, D.C. --The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR), a database of genetic and molecular biology data for the laboratory plant Arabidopsis thaliana, is one of the most widely used plant databases in the world. Some 60,000 scientists visit the site and view over 1,000,000 pages per...

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Stanford, CA— Coral reefs are tremendously important for ocean biodiversity, as well as for the economic and aesthetic value they provide to their surrounding communities. Unfortunately they have been in great decline in recent years, much of it due to the effects of global...

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Washington, D.C.— Postdoctoral fellow, Rubén Rellán-Álvarez at the Department of Plant Biology has been awarded the prestigious Marschner Young Scientist Award by the International Plant Nutrition Colloquium. The award was established for “outstanding Ph.D. students and early-career researchers...

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Washington, D.C.—Hydrocarbons from the Earth make up the oil and gas that heat our homes and fuel our cars. The study of the various phases of molecules formed from carbon and hydrogen under high pressures and temperatures, like those found in the Earth's interior, helps...

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Washington, D.C.— A great deal of research has focused on the amount of global warming resulting from increased greenhouse gas concentrations. But there has been relatively little study of the pace of the change following these increases. A new study by Carnegie’s Ken Caldeira...

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Washington, D.C.— A new planet-hunting survey has revealed planetary candidates with orbital periods as short as four hours and so close to their host stars that they are nearly skimming the stellar surface. If confirmed, these candidates would be among the closest planets to...

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Pasadena, CA—A team of researchers including Carnegie’s Mansi Kasliwal and John Mulchaey used a novel astronomical survey software system—the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF)—to link a new stripped-envelope supernova, named iPTF13bvn, to the star from which it...

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October 24, 2013

Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics

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Washington, DC—For the first time, researchers have been able to map the true extent of gold mining in the biologically diverse region of Madre De Dios in the Peruvian Amazon. The team combined field surveys with airborne mapping and high-resolution satellite monitoring to show...

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CarnegieScience On the Inside
Superconducting Surprise, p 3
Flying Tours with the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, p 2
No Stem Cells for...

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Stanford, CA—Inside every plant cell, a cytoskeleton provides an interior scaffolding to direct construction of the cell’s walls, and thus the growth of the organism as a whole. Environmental and hormonal...

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Washington, D.C.— Reconstructing the rise of life during the period of Earth’s history when it first evolved is challenging. Earth’s oldest sedimentary rocks are not only rare, but also almost always altered by...

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Greg Asner: Ecology from the Air: TED talk
What are our forests really...

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Washington, D.C.— Around 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period, there was a mass extinction so severe that it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth’s history. Some...

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Washington, D.C.— Life originated as a result of natural processes that exploited early Earth’s raw materials. Scientific models of life’s origins almost always look to minerals for such essential tasks as the synthesis of life’s molecular building blocks or the supply of...

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Washington, D.C.— Government calculations of total U.S. methane emissions may underestimate the true values by 50 percent, a new study finds. The results are published the week of November 25 in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...

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Holiday Leaves -- Image credit: Bi-Huei Hou, Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Plant Biology

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Washington, D.C.—The Carnegie Institution for Science received the highest rating for sound fiscal management and commitment to accountability and transparency—four stars—from Charity Navigator for the thirteenth consecutive year. Charity Navigator is America's largest charity evaluator. Only 2...

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Baltimore, MD—In researching neural pathways, it helps to establish an analogous relationship between a region of the human brain and the brains of more-easily studied animal species. New work from a team led...

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Baltimore, MD— One classical question in developmental biology is how different tissue types arise in the correct position of the developing embryo. While one signaling pathway that controls this process has...

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Life originated as a result of natural processes that exploited early Earth's raw materials. Scientific models of life's origins almost always look to minerals for such essential tasks as the synthesis of life's molecular building blocks or the supply of metabolic energy.

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Pasadena, CA— Astronomers, including Carnegie’s Yuri Beletsky, took precise measurements of the closest pair of failed stars to the Sun, which suggest that the system harbors a third, planetary-mass object.The research is published as a letter to the editor in Astronomy & Astrophysics...

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Washington, D.C.— Forest conservation is an issue of major concern to communities large and small around the globe. But gathering the monitoring data needed to make the right decisions has proven extremely...

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Washington, D.C.—Table salt, sodium chloride, is one of the first chemical compounds that schoolchildren learn. Standard chemistry textbooks say that sodium and chlorine have very different electronegativities and thus must form an ionic compound with a well-defined composition...

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Washington, D.C.--Christopher Field, the founding director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology and co-chair of the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), Working Group 2, has been awarded the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Climate Change, “for...

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January 16, 2014

Dance on a Volcano: A Quarter Century of Experimental First Ascents 

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Baltimore, MD— As all school-children learn, cells divide using a process called mitosis, which consists of a number of phases during which duplicate copies of the cell's DNA-containing chromosomes are pulled...

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Baltimore, MD
—Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupters, such as bisphenol A, which mimic estrogen, is associated with adverse health effects. Bisphenol A is commonly found in plastic bottles and plastic...

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Stanford, CA—Carnegie’s Li-Quing Chen, recipient of a Tansley Medal for Excellence in Plant Science, announced late last year, is honored with an editorial and minireview in New Phytologist this month.

The journal’s Tansley medal is awarded each year in...

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Washington, D.C.—New research shows that a remarkable defect in synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition allows researchers to measure, witness, and potentially manipulate electrons in a manner that could lead to new “quantum technology” for information processing. The study is...

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Washington, D.C.— The pace of global warming over the last century has been about twice as rapid over land than over the oceans and will continue to be more dramatic going forward if emissions are not curbed...

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Stanford, CA— As every gardner knows, nitrogen is crucial for a plant’s growth. But nitrogen absorption is inefficient. This means that on the scale of food crops, adding significant levels of nitrogen to the...

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Pasadena, CA–The international consortium of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) project has passed two major reviews and is positioned to enter the construction phase. When completed, the 25-meter GMT will have more than six times the collecting area of the largest telescopes today and ten times...

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February 20, 2014

Dr. Robert Hazen, Carnegie Institution for Science, Geophysical Laboratory

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Washington, D.C.— In many ways, plants act as chemical factories, using energy from sunlight to produce carbon-based energy and taking nutrients from the soil in order to synthesize a wide variety of products. Carnegie scientists asked the question: How much does the portfolio...

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Pasadena, CA— Some galaxies grew up in a hurry. Most of the galaxies that have been observed from the early days of the universe were young and actively...

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Stanford, CA— Evolution is based on diversity, and sexual reproduction is key to creating a diverse population that secures competitiveness in nature. Plants had to solve a problem: they needed to find ways to...

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Washington, D.C.—New global imaging and topographic data from MESSENGER* show that the innermost planet has contracted far more than previous estimates. The results are based on a global study of more than 5,900 geological...

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Plants convert energy from sunlight into chemical energy during a process called photosynthesis. This energy is passed on to humans and animals that eat the plants, and thus photosynthesis is the primary source of energy for all life on Earth. But the photosynthetic activity of various regions...

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March 25, 2014--The Kavli Foundation’s board of directors has announced the election of three new board members including Richard A. Meserve, president of the Carnegie Institution for Science, expanding the board from five to eight members.

“As head of the Carnegie...

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Washington, D.C.—The Solar System has a new most-distant member, bringing its outer frontier into focus.

New work from Carnegie's Scott Sheppard and Chadwick Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory reports the discovery of a distant dwarf planet, called 2012 VP113, which was...

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March 27, 2014

Dr. José R. Dinneny, Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Plant Biology

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WASHINGTON, D.C.– The world's largest celebration of science and engineering, the USA Science & Engineering Festival, will return to Washington, D.C., April 25-27, 2014. For our third year, the Carnegie Institution for Science will participate with hands-on experiences and opportunities to...

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Stanford, CA—Floods and droughts are increasingly in the news, and climate experts say their frequency will only go up in the future. As such, it is crucial for scientists to learn more about how these extreme events affect...

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Stanford, CA— Photosynthesis provides fixed carbon and energy for nearly all life on Earth, yet many aspects of this fascinating process remain mysterious. For example, little is known about how it is regulated...

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April 22, 2014

Dr. Maria T. Zuber 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences

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Washington, D.C.— Linda Elkins-Tanton, director of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, is resigning her position at Carnegie, effective May 9, 2014. She has accepted a position as the director of the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University,...

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Washington, D.C.— Despite overwhelming scientific evidence for the impending dangers of human-made climate change, policy decisions leading to substantial emissions reduction have been slow. New work from Carnegie's Katharine Ricke and Ken Caldeira focuses on the intersection...

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Pasadena, CA— Astronomer and instrumentation expert Stephen Shectman of the Carnegie Observatories has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Shectman investigates the large-scale structure of the distribution of galaxies; searches for ancient stars; develops novel and creative...

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Pasadena, CA— New work from a team of scientists including Carnegie’s Josh Simon analyzed the chemical elements in the faintest known galaxy, called Segue 1, and determined that it is effectively a fossil galaxy left over from the early universe.

Astronomers hoping to...

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Stanford, CA—Plants spend their entire lifetime rooted to one spot. When faced with a bad situation, such as a swarm of hungry herbivores or a viral outbreak, they have no option to flee but instead must fight...

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Stanford, CA—All living cells are held together by membranes, which provide a barrier to the transport of nutrients. They are also the communication platform connecting the outside world to the cell’s interior...

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Washington, D.C.—By unanimous vote of the Carnegie Board of Trustees, Dr. Matthew P. Scott has been appointed the 10th president of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Dr. Scott is Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, Bioengineering, and Biology at the Stanford University School of...

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"Matt understood our Carnegie. He was excited about the potential of working with us. In parallel, we were thrilled with his ideas, which melded our current state of experience with projected innovative approaches for the future."

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"Matt Scott transformed Stanford's bioscience research as an inspirational and effective leader of Stanford's interdisciplinary Bio-X Program.

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“Matt Scott is a great choice to lead the Carnegie Institution for Science. As a world-class biologist and Chair of Stanford’s Bio-X initiative, Matt has a deep understanding of what leading-edge, interdisciplinary science requires.
 
He also has boundless curiosity about the world...

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“Matt Scott will be a visionary leader of the Carnegie Institution at a time when so many extraordinary technological breakthroughs have opened up unprecedented opportunities in science.”
 
Lucy Shapiro, Director, Beckman Center for Molecular & Genetic Medicine

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“Matt Scott will continue a tradition of strong leadership at the helm of the Carnegie—he is a highly accomplished developmental biologist who also has broad and deep interests in many other areas of discovery research including the environment, molecular evolution, and multiple disciplines...

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“Matt Scott is the perfect choice to lead the Carnegie Institution for Science. A world-renowned geneticist, his wide-ranging discoveries have illuminated how the body takes shape during embryonic development and led to the development of new cancer therapies. He is unusual in the breadth of his...

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Pasadena, CA— The structures and star populations of massive galaxies appear to change as they age, but much about how these galaxies formed and evolved remains mysterious. Many of the oldest and most...

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Pasadena, CA—Wolf-Rayet stars are very large and very hot. Astronomers have long wondered whether Wolf-Rayet stars are the progenitors of certain types of supernovae. New work from the Palomar Transient Factory team, including Carnegie’s Mansi Kasliwal, is homing in on the...

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Washington, D.C.—Breaking research news from a team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Ho-kwang “Dave” Mao reveals that the composition of the Earth’s lower mantle may be significantly different than previously thought. These results are to be published by Science.

...

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Baltimore, MD— A woman’s supply of eggs is a precious commodity because only a few hundred mature eggs can be produced throughout her lifetime and each must be as free as possible from genetic damage. Part of egg production involves a winnowing of the egg supply during fetal...

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Washington, D.C.— An international team of astronomers, including five Carnegie scientists, reports the discovery of two new planets orbiting a very old star that is near to our own Sun. One of these planets...

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Stanford, CA— A team of researchers studying a flowering plant has zeroed in on the way cells manage external signals about prevailing conditions, a capability that is essential for cells to survive in a...

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Stanford, CA—Soil is a microscopic maze of nooks and crannies that hosts a wide array of life. Plants explore this environment by developing a complex branched network of roots that tap into scarce resources...

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Washington, D.C.-—The American Geophysical Union (AGU) announced on June 30 that Christopher Field will receive the Roger Revelle Medal. Field is director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology.

The medal is...

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Washington, D.C.—The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Carnegie $10 million over four years for basic research that could lead to the discovery of new energy materials through its program to support Energy Frontier Research Centers. The Carnegie center, Energy Frontier Research in Extreme...

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Pasadena, CA—Something is amiss in the Universe. There appears to be an enormous deficit of ultraviolet light in the cosmic budget.

The vast reaches of empty space between galaxies are bridged by...

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Washington, DC—Eating meat contributes to climate change, due to greenhouse gasses emitted by livestock. New research finds that livestock emissions are on the rise and that beef cattle are responsible for far more greenhouse gas emissions than other types of animals. It is...

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Washington, D.C.—The planet’s soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. This happens through a process called...

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Washington, D.C.—Nobel laureate and trustee emeritus Charles Townes is celebrating his 99th birthday on Monday, July 28.
Townes joined the Carnegie board in 1965, one year after he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics with Alexander Prokhorov and Nikolai Basov for the...

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Scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Perú. The mapping project is a joint effort among the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO), led by Carnegie’s Greg Asner, the Ministry of Environment of Perú, and Wake Forest...

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Washington, D.C.— Molybdenum disulfide is a compound often used in dry lubricants and in petroleum refining. Its semiconducting ability and similarity to the carbon-based graphene makes molybdenum disulfide of...

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Washington, D.C.—Astronomers have discovered an extremely cool object that could have a particularly diverse history—although it is now as cool as a planet, it may have spent much of its youth as hot as a star.

The current temperature of the object is 200 to 300 degrees...

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Wendy Freedman, the Crawford H. Greenewalt Director of the Carnegie Observatories and chair of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization has accepted a position as a University Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, departing Carnegie September 1, 2014. Associate...

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Stanford, CA—Everyone’s heard of the birds and the bees. But that old expression leaves out the flowers that are being fertilized. The fertilization process for flowering plants is particularly complex and...

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As part of Carnegie’s public outreach efforts, the institution hosts various science-related lectures, events, and seminars at its administration building in Washington, D.C., and at the Carnegie campuses on the East and West Coasts.

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The Carnegie Institution publications office issues periodical and special publications, issues press releases, and manages web content. Recent issues of the institution's quarterly newsletter, the annual year book, and other recent publications are also available on this site.

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The Carnegie Institution publications office issues periodical and special publications, issues press releases, and manages web content. Recent issues of the institution's quarterly newsletter, the annual year book, and other recent publications are also available on this site.

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The Carnegie Institution has published over 600 books since 1902. Many of the books are available online from the institution's website, but as of July 1, 2007, we are no longer selling bound versions of our publication.

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Washington, D.C.—Dr. Matthew P. Scott joins the Carnegie Institution for Science as its 10th president September 1, 2014. Scott was Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, Bioengineering, and Biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He spent nearly 24 years at Stanford. The...

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New work has for the first time elucidated the atomic structures of the bacterial prototype of sugar transporters, termed “SWEET” transporters, found in plants and humans.

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Stanford, CA—Sugars are an essential source of energy for microrganisms, animals, and humans. They are produced by plants, which convert energy from sunlight into chemical energy in the form of sugars through...

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Washington, D.C.— Forest conservation is an issue of major concern to communities large and small around the globe. But gathering the monitoring data needed to make the right decisions has proven extremely prohibitive for individuals to entire governments.

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Each year, the journal The Scientist ranks academic research institutions across the US. This year, Plant Biology is among the top 5.

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Carnegie Institution Observatories researchers are featured in Astronomy Magazine discussing dark matter and what supernovae may tell us about the fate of the universe.

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New research shows that a remarkable defect in synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition allows researchers to measure, witness, and potentially manipulate. 

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Carnegie supports research in the earth, space and life sciences.
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A new area in biological research—“Evo Devo,” for short—may be the key to understanding why and how the animal world has developed the spectacular evolutionary diversity we see all around us.

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Pasadena, CA —The board of directors of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) has informed the National Science Foundation (NSF) that they will not participate in an upcoming funding opportunity.

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China has halted exports to Japan of rare earth elements — which are crucial for advanced manufacturing — trading company officials said Friday amid tensions between the rival Asian powers over a territorial dispute.

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Baltimore, MD--The General Motors Corporation is presenting a $5,000.00 award to Carnegie’s BioEYES K-12 educational program on September 11, 2014, to deliver a two-week environmental curriculum,...

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Washington, D.C.—A team of scientists led by Carnegie's Jacqueline Faherty has discovered the first evidence of water ice clouds on an object outside of our own Solar System. Water ice clouds exist on our own gas...

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Pasadena, CA—Quasars are supermassive black holes that live at the center of distant massive galaxies. They shine as the most luminous beacons in the sky across the entire electromagnetic spectrum by rapidly...

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Astronomers have discovered an extremely cool object that could have a particularly diverse history—although it is now as cool as a planet, it may have spent much of its youth as hot as a star. The current temperature of the object is intermediate between that of the Earth and of Venus

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Washington, DC— A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s. The scientists...

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Beginning in 1895, Andrew Carnegie contributed his vast fortune toward the establishment of 23 organizations that today bear his name and carry on work in such fields as art, education, international affairs, peace, and scientific research.

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Andrew Carnegie established a unique organization dedicated to scientific discovery “to encourage, in the broadest and most liberal manner, investigation, research, and discovery and the application of knowledge to the improvement of mankind...” The philosophy was and is to devote the

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Washington, D.C.—New modeling studies from Carnegie’s Alan Boss demonstrate that most of the stars we see were formed when unstable clusters of newly formed protostars broke up. These protostars are born out of...

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Washington, D.C.— Gallium arsenide, GaAs, a semiconductor composed of gallium and arsenic is well known to have physical properties that promise practical applications. In the form of nanowires and nanoparticles, it has particular potential for use in the manufacture of solar...

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Washington, D.C.— A team including Carnegie’s Malcolm Guthrie and George Cody has, for the first time, discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest...

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Washington, D.C.—Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to...

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A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s.

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Washington, D.C.—Sean Solomon, director of Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism from 1992 until 2012 will receive the nation’s highest scientific award, the National Medal of Science at a White House ceremony later this year.

Sean Solomon's career has been characterized by an...

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Astronomer and photographer Yuri Beletsky captured today's lunar eclipse from Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory

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The hypothalamus is an essential brain center that maintains multiple physiological homeostatic processes by modulating pituitary hormone secretions. Two centers (nuclei) of the hypothalamus, the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei (PVN and SON), contain various hormone-producing neurons.

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Stanford, CA—When it comes to cellular architecture, function follows form.

Plant cells contain a dynamic cytoskeleton which is responsible for directing cell growth, development, movement, and division. So over time, changes in the cytoskeleton form the shape and...

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Washington, D.C.— Hydrogen—the most abundant element in the cosmos—responds to extremes of pressure and temperature differently. Under ambient conditions hydrogen is a gaseous two-atom molecule. As confinement pressure increases, the molecules adopt different states of matter—like when water ice...

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Stanford, CA— Proteins are the machinery that accomplishes almost every task in every cell in every living organism. The instructions for how to build each protein are written into a cell’s DNA.

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The Geophysical Laboratory has made important advances in the growth of diamond by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).  Methods have been developed to produce single-crystal diamond at low pressure having a broad range of properties.

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Baltimore, MD—As animals age, their immune systems gradually deteriorate, a process called immunosenescence. It is associated with systemic inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders, as well as with many cancers.

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Plants are essential to life on Earth and provide us with food, fuel, clothing, and shelter.  Despite all this, we know very little about how they do what they do.

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Devaki Bhaya wants to understand how environmental stressors, such as light, nutrients, and viral attacks are sensed by and affect photosynthetic microorganisms.

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Plants are not as static as you think. David Ehrhardt combines confocal microscopy with novel visualization methods to see the three-dimensional movement  within live plant cells to reveal the other-worldly cell choreography that makes up plant tissues.

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Matthew Evans wants to provide new tools for plant scientists to engineer better seeds for human needs. He focuses on one of the two phases to their life cycle.

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Arthur Grossman believes that the future of plant science depends on research that spans ecology, physiology, molecular biology and genomics. As such, work in his lab has been extremely diverse.

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Zhiyong Wang was appointed acting director of Department of Plant Biology in 2018.

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Revolutionary progress in understanding plant biology is being driven through advances in DNA sequencing technology.

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In March 2014, a technical support unit (TSU) of ten, headquartered at Global Ecology, had successfully completed a herculean management effort for the 2000-page assessment Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, including two summaries.

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Until now, computer models have been the primary tool for estimating photosynthetic productivity on a global scale.

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Chris Field is a co-principal investigator of the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve in northern California.

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Coral reefs are havens for marine biodiversity and underpin the economies of many coastal communities. But they are very sensitive to changes in ocean chemistry resulting from greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to pollution, warming waters, overdevelopment, and overfishing.

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Anna Michalak’s team combined sampling and satellite-based observations of Lake Erie with computer simulations and determined that the 2011 record-breaking algal bloom in the lake was triggered by long-term agricultural practices coupled with extreme precipitation, followed by weak lake cir

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Joe Berry has been a Carnegie investigator since 1972. He has developed powerful tools to measure local and regional exchanges of carbon over spaces of up to thousands of square miles. He uses information at the plant scale to extrapolate the carbon balance at regional and continental scales.

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Ken Caldeira has been a Carnegie investigator since 2005 and is world renowned for his modeling and other work on the global carbon cycle; marine biogeochemistry and chemical oceanography, including ocean acidification and the atmosphere/ocean carbon cycle; land-cover and climate change; the...

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Anna Michalak joined Carnegie in 2011 from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan.

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Washington, D.C.— A new high-resolution mapping strategy has revealed billions of tons of carbon in Peruvian forests that can be preserved as part of an effort to sequester carbon stocks in the fight against climate change.

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Stanford, CA—Photosynthesis is probably the most well-known aspect of plant biochemistry.

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The recent discovery that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate has profoundly affected physics. If the universe were gravity-dominated then it should be decelerating.

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The Carnegie Hubble program is an ongoing comprehensive effort that has a goal of determining the Hubble constant, the expansion rate of the universe,  to a systematic accuracy of 2%.

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The Carnegie Irvine Galaxy Survey is obtaining high-quality optical and near-infrared images of several hundred of the brightest galaxies in the southern hemisphere sky, at Carnegie’s Las Campanas Observatory to investigate the structural properties of galaxies.

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The Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) survey, currently underway at the Magellan-Baade 6.5m telescope in Chile, has been specifically designed to characterize normal galaxies and their environments at a distance of about 4 billion years post Big Bang, expresses by astronomers as  z=1.5.

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The WGESP was charged with acting as a focal point for research on extrasolar planets and organizing IAU activities in the field, including reviewing techniques and maintaining a list of identified planets.

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Along with Alycia Weinberger and Ian Thompson, Alan Boss has been running the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search (CAPS) program, which searches for extrasolar planets by the astrometric method, where the planet's presence is detected indirectly through the wobble of the host star around the c

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Carnegie's Paul Butler has been leading work on a multiyear project to carry out the first reconnaissance of all 2,000 nearby Sun-like stars within 150 light-years of the solar system (1 lightyear is about 9.4 trillion kilometers).

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Some 40 thousand tons of extraterrestrial material fall on Earth every year. This cosmic debris provides cosmochemist Conel Alexander with information about the formation of the Solar System, our galaxy, and perhaps the origin of life.

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Galacticus is not a super hero; it’s a super model used to determine the formation and evolution of the galaxies. Developed by Andrew Benson, the George Ellery Hale Distinguished Scholar in Theoretical Astrophysics, it is one of the most advanced models of galaxy formation available.

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Rebecca Bernstein combines observational astronomy with developing new instruments and techniques to study her objects of interest.

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Alan Boss is a theorist and an observational astronomer.

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While the planets in our Solar System are astonishingly diverse, all of them move around the Sun in approximately the same orbital plane, in the same direction, and primarily in circular orbits.

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With the proliferation of discoveries of planets orbiting other stars, the race is on to find habitable worlds akin to the Earth. At present, however, extrasolar planets less massive than Saturn cannot be reliably detected.

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Like some other Carnegie astronomers, staff associate Jeffrey Crane blends science with technology. His primary interests are instrumentation, the Milky Way and the neighboring Local Group of galaxies, in addition to extrasolar planets.

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Looking far into space is looking back in time. Staff astronomer emeritus Alan Dressler began his career at Carnegie some years ago as a Carnegie Fellow.

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The earliest galaxies are those that are most distant. Staff associate Dan Kelson is interested in how these ancient relics evolved.

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Juna Kollmeier’s research is an unusual combination—she is as observationally-oriented theorist making predictions that can be compared to current and future observations. Her primary focus is on the emergence of structure in the universe.

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Distant galaxies offer a glimpse of the universe as it was billions of years ago. Understanding how the Milky Way and other galaxies originated provides a unique perspective on the fundamental physics of cosmology, the invisible dark matter, and  repulsive force of dark energy.

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We are all made of stardust. Almost all of the chemical elements were produced by nuclear reactions in the interiors of stars. When a star dies a fraction of the elements is released into the inter-stellar gas clouds, out of which successive generations of stars form.

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John Mulchaey is the director and the Crawford H. Greenewalt Chair of the Carnegie Observatories. He investigates groups and clusters of galaxies, elliptical galaxies, dark matter—the invisible material that makes up most of the universe—active galaxies and black holes.

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Cosmochemist Larry Nittler studies extraterrestrial materials, including meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), to understand the formation of the Solar System, the galaxy, and the universe and to identify the materials involved.

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Staff astronomer emeritus Eric Persson headed a group that develops and uses telescope instrumentation to exploit new near-infrared (IR) imaging array detectors.

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Mark Phillips is the Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) Director Emeritus. From 2006 to 2017 Phillips served as the Associate Director for Magellan, and from 2014 to 2017 he was the interim LCO Director. He is a world-renowned supernova expert.

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Director Emeritus, George Preston has been deciphering the chemical evolution of stars in our Milky Way for a quarter of a century.

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The entire universe—galaxies, stars, and planets—originally condensed from a vast network of tenuous, gaseous filaments, known as the intergalactic medium, or the gaseous cosmic web.

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Staff member emeritus François Schweizer studies galaxy assembly and evolution by observing nearby galaxies, particularly how collisions and mergers affect their properties.

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Stephen Shectman blends his celestial interests with his gift of developing novel telescope instrumentation.

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Scott Sheppard studies the dynamical and physical properties of small bodies in our Solar System, such as asteroids, comets, moons and trans-neptunian objects (bodies that orbit beyond Neptune).  These objects have a fossilized imprint from the formation and migration of the major planets in

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Josh Simon uses observations of nearby galaxies to study problems related to dark matter, chemical evolution, star formation, and the process of galaxy evolution.

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Globular clusters are spherical systems of some 100,000  gravitationally bound stars. They are among the oldest components of our galaxy and are key to understanding the age and scale of the universe.

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Alycia Weinberger wants to understand how planets form, so she observes young stars in our galaxy and their disks, from which planets are born. She also looks for and studies planetary systems.

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Starting in 2005, the High Lava Plains project is focused on a better understanding of why the Pacific Northwest, specifically eastern Oregon's High Lava Plains, is so volcanically active.

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High-elevation, low relief surfaces are common on continents. These intercontinental plateaus influence river networks, climate, and the migration of plants and animals. How these plateaus form is not clear.

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Superdeep diamonds are  tiny time capsules carrying unchanged impurities made eons ago and providing researchers with important clues about Earth’s formation.  Diamonds derived from below the continental lithosphere, are most likely from the transition zone (415 miles, or 670km de

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Carnegie was once part of the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI).Carnegie Science at Broad Branch Road was one of the  founding members of the 1998 teams who partnered with NASA, and remained a member through several Cooperative Agreement No

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Carnegie scientists participate in NASA's Kepler missions, the first mission capable of finding Earth-size planets around other stars.

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The Anglo-Australian Planet Search (AAPS) is a long-term program being carried out on the 3.9-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) to search for giant planets around more than 240 nearby Sun-like stars.

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Geochemist and director of Terrestrial Magnetism, Richard Carlson, looks at the diversity of the chemistry of the early solar nebula and the incorporation of that chemistry into the terrestrial planets.

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What sets George Cody apart from other geochemists is his pioneering use of sophisticated techniques such as enormous facilities for synchrotron radiation, and sample analysis with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize hydrocarbons.

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Scientists simulate the high pressures and temperatures of planetary interiors to measure their physical properties.

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Earth scientist Robert Hazen has an unusually rich research portfolio.

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Carbon plays an unparalleled role in our lives: as the element of life, as the basis of most of society’s energy, as the backbone of most new materials, and as the central focus in efforts to understand Earth’s variable and uncertain climate.

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Alan Linde is trying to understand the tectonic activity that is associated with earthquakes and volcanos, with the hope of helping predictions methods.

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Roiling cauldrons of liquid-laden material flow within Earth’s rocky interior. Understanding how this matter moves and changes is essential to deciphering Earth’s formation and evolution as well as the processes that create seismic activity, such as earthquakes and volcanoes.

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Volcanologist Diana Roman is interested in the mechanics of how magma moves through the Earth’s crust, and in the structure, evolution, and dynamics of volcanic conduit systems. Her ultimate goal is to understand the likelihood and timing of volcanic eruptions.

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Rocks, fossils, and other natural relics hold clues to ancient environments in the form of different ratios of isotopes—atomic variants of elements with the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons.

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Anat Shahar is pioneering a field that blends isotope geochemistry with high-pressure experiments to examine planetary cores and the Solar System’s formation, prior to planet formation, and how the planets formed and differentiated.

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Geochemist Steven Shirey is researching how Earth's continents formed. Continent formation spans most of Earth's history, continents were key to the emergence of life, and they contain a majority of Earth’s resources.

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Washington, D.C.--A two-person team of Carnegie's Scott Sheppard and Chadwick Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory has discovered a new active asteroid, called 62412, in the Solar System's main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

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As animals age, their immune systems gradually deteriorate, a process called immunosenescence. It is associated with systemic inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders, as well as with many cancers.

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Andrew Steele uses traditional and biotechnological approaches for the detection of microbial life in the field of astrobiology and Solar System exploration. Astrobiology is the search for the origin and distribution of life in the universe.

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Seismic waves flow through Earth’s solid and liquid material differently, allowing Earth scientists to determine various aspects of the composition of the Earth’s interior. Broadband seismology looks at a broad spectrum of waves for high-resolution imaging.

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Approximately half of the gene sequences of human and mouse genomes comes from so-called mobile elements—genes that jump around the genome.

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The Fan laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms that govern mammalian development, using the mouse as a model.

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In mammals, most lipids, such as fatty acids and cholesterol, are absorbed into the body via the small intestine. The complexity of the cells and fluids that inhabit this organ make it very difficult to study in a laboratory setting.

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The Gall laboratory studies all aspects of the cell nucleus, particularly the structure of chromosomes, the transcription and processing of RNA, and the role of bodies inside the cell nucleus, especially the Cajal body (CB) and the histone locus body (HLB).

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The Marnie Halpern laboratory studies how left-right differences arise in the developing brain and discovers the genes that control this asymmetry.

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The Spradling laboratory studies the biology of reproduction. By unknown means eggs reset the normally irreversible processes of differentiation and aging. The fruit fly Drosophila provides a favorable multicellular system for molecular genetic studies.

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Washington, D.C. —A key to understanding Earth’s evolution is to look deep into the lower mantle—a region some 400 to 1,800 miles (660 to 2,900 kilometers) below the surface, just above the core.

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The Zheng lab studies cell division including the study of stem cells, genome organization, and lineage specification.

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Integrity of hereditary material—the genome —is critical for species survival. Genomes need protection from agents that can cause mutations affecting DNA coding, regulatory functions, and duplication during cell division.

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The Donald Brown laboratory uses  amphibian metamorphosis to study complex developmental programs such as the development of vertebrate organs. The thyroid gland secretes thyroxine (TH), a hormone essential for the growth and development of all vertebrates including humans.

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The mouse is a traditional model organism for understanding physiological processes in humans. Chen-Ming Fan uses the mouse to study the underlying mechanisms involved in human development and genetic diseases.

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In mammals, most lipids, such as fatty acids and cholesterol, are absorbed into the body via the small intestine. The complexity of the cells and fluids that inhabit this organ make it very difficult to study in a laboratory setting.

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The first step in gene expression is the formation of an RNA copy of its DNA. This step, called transcription, takes place in the cell nucleus. Transcription requires an enzyme called RNA polymerase to catalyze the synthesis of the RNA from the DNA template.

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There is a lot of folklore about left-brain, right-brain differences—the right side of the brain is supposed to be the creative side, while the left is the logical half. But it’s much more complicated than that.

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Allan Spradling is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and director of the Department of Embryology.

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Yixian Zheng is Director of the Department of Embryology. Her lab has a long-standing interest in cell division.

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Carbon plays an unparalleled role in our lives: as the element of life, as the basis of most of society’s energy, as the backbone of most new materials, and as the central focus in efforts to understand Earth’s variable and uncertain climate.

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Ronald Cohen primarily studies materials through first principles research—computational methods that begin with the most fundamental properties of a system, such as the nuclear charges of atoms, and then calculate what happens to a material under different conditions, such as pressure and

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Timothy Strobel subjects materials to high-pressures to understand chemical processes  and interactions, and to create new, advanced energy-related materials.

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Viktor Struzhkin develops new techniques for high-pressure experiments to measure transport and magnetic properties of materials to understand aspects of geophysics, planetary science, and condensed-matter physics.

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Andrew Steele joins the Rosetta team as a co-investigator working on the COSAC instrument aboard the Philae lander (Fred Goesmann Max Planck Institute - PI). On 12 November 2014 the Philae system will be deployed to land on the comet and begin operations.

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Carnegie investigators are leaders in the fields of  astronomy, Earth & planetary science, genetics & developmental biology, global ecology, matter at extreme states, and plant science.

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Beginning in 1895, Andrew Carnegie contributed his vast fortune to the establishment of 22 organizations around the world that today bear his name and carry on work in fields as diverse as art, education, international...

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie announced today that it will receive Phase II funding through Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative created by the...

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Stanford, CA—Photosynthesis is the process by which plants convert energy from the sunlight into chemical energy in the form of sugars. These sugars are used by plants to grow and function, as well as food for animals and humans that eat them.

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Dark matter is the mysterious nonluminous material that makes up about most of the universe.  Dark energy is a mysterious repulsive force. Together they make up about 95% of the universe. The rest--all observable matter--adds up to less than 5% of the universe.

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Some galaxies have centers that are hundreds of times brighter than normal galaxies. These central regions are called active galactic nuclei (AGN); the most energetic and distant AGNs in the universe are known as quasars.

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Everything, including us, is essentially made from star dust. Hydrogen and helium were produced in the Big Bang. But most other elements were produced by nuclear reactions in the interiors of stars over successive generations.

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One of humankind's most fasicinating mysteries is how life evolved on this planet and whether it exists elsewhere. Carnegie is part of the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI).

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Test of embedded YouTube video:

It works!

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Carnegie astronomer Mark Phillips, interim director of the Las Campanas Observatory, is one of a group of scientists being honored with the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. The prize recognizes “major insights into the deepest questions of the Universe” and is being...

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Tiny cages hold big promise. Understanding the chemical reactions that can create tiny molecular cages that hold other “guest” molecules—structures called clathrates—is key to creating a new generation of electronic devices and possible energy materials.

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Carbon plays an unparalleled role in our lives: as the element of life, as the basis of most of society’s energy, as the backbone of most new materials, and as the central focus in efforts to understand Earth’s variable and uncertain climate.

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New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Greg Asner shows the limitations of long-used research methods in tropical rainforest ecology and points to new technological approaches for understanding forest structures and systems on large geographic scales. 

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The Giant Magellan Telescope will be one member of the next class of super giant earth-based telescopes that promises to revolutionize our view and understanding of the universe. It will be constructed in the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.

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Washington, D.C.—Silicon is the second most-abundant element in the earth's crust. When purified, it takes on a diamond structure, which is essential to modern electronic devicescarbon is to biology as silicon is to technology.

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Learn how Peru's carbon was quantified; understand how meat turns up the global heat; and read the inaugural letter from Carnegie's new president Matt Scott in the latest issue of CarnegieScience

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Together with Dr. Jamie Shuda, Steve Farber created a Science Outreach Program, Project BioEYES, that incorporates life science and laboratory education using zebrafish.

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Tuesday, November 25, 2014, Baltimore, MD—Biologist Marnie Halpern of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for her “fundamental contributions to developmental biology, particularly usin

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New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Greg Asner shows the limitations of long-used research methods in tropical rainforest ecology and points to new technological approaches for understanding forest structures and systems on large geographic scales. For decades, the primary method of

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The climate warming caused by a single carbon emission takes only about 10 years to reach its maximum effect. This is important because it refutes the common misconception that today’s emissions won’t be felt for decades and that they are a problem for future generations. 

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Ms. Nora Johnson is former vice chairman of The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

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Dr. Eric D. Isaacs begins his tenure as the 11th president of the Carnegie Institution on July 2, 2018.  Isaacs joins Carnegie from the University of Chicago where he has been the Robert A.

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Dr. Duffy advises on asset allocation strategy, economic analysis, and portfolio design. He was a founder and Senior Managing Director at the Strategic Investment Group (Strategic), an Arlington, Virginia-based manager of customized portfolios for institutional and private investors.

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Natural gas power plants produce substantial amounts of gases that lead to global warming. Replacing old coal-fired power plants with new natural gas plants could cause climate damage to increase over the next decades, unless their methane leakage rates are very low and the new power plants are...

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Dr. Faber is University Professor Emerita and former chair of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC).  From August 2012 to Jun 2014, she also served as interim director of the University of California Observatories.  Dr.

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An educator and innovator, Bruce Walker Ferguson is president of the American University of Iraq, Sulaimani.  With 1,600 students from diverse backgrounds, AUIS was founded in 2007 to provide an American-style liberal arts education in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

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Dr. King is the American Cancer Society Professor in the Departments of Genome Sciences and Medicine at the University of Washington.  She studies the genetics of complex, common human conditions.

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Dr. Samper is president and chief executive officer of the Wildlife Conservation Society, headquartered in New York.

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Mr. Stone is an external member of the Investment Committee at the Family Office of Lord Sainsbury of Turville, Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, and a former Minister for Science and Innovation in the United Kingdom.  Mr. Stone also advises two U.S.

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Mr. Wilson is managing director of EON Productions Ltd., the production company responsible for the official James Bond film series.  He joined EON in 1972 and since 1979 has been an executive producer or producer in every James Bond film, currently.  Mr.

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The Milky Way -- Image Credit: Consuelo Gonzalez, Carnegie Institution for Science, The Observatories

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Read the Newsweek article that describes how Greg Asner created the first high-resolution carbon maps of the entire country of Peru

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Simple way to make a gift on Carnegie's secure website.

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To give by phone, call Brian Loretz at (202) 939-1123.

To give by mail, please make check payable to the Carnegie Institution. If you would like to designate your gift to a specific area of science or department, please include that information with your gift. 

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If you would like to make a contribution to Carnegie Science via wire transfer, please contact Ann McElwain ( 202-939-1123 / amcelwain@carnegiescience.edu ) to receive instructions and to confirm gift purpose.  Thank you.​

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If you would like to transfer securities to Carnegie Science, please contact Michael Pimenov (202-939-1105 / mpimenov@carnegiescience.edu) to receive instructions and to confirm gift purpose.  Thank you.

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The Carnegie Fund is the institution’s annual giving program, which is supported by Carnegie friends and alumni.

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Carnegie is renowned for its post-doctoral and graduate student fellowship programs, which operate on each of the Carnegie campuses.

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Carnegie Science carries out a range of educational programs targeted at K-12 school children, teachers, and the general public. 

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The Carnegie Institution hosts public lectures at its headquarters building at 1530 P Street NW and at the Broad Branch Road campus (at Broad Branch Road and 32nd Street NW), both in Washington, DC, and at A Noise Within Theater (3352 East Foothill...

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A bequest is the simplest and most common way to establish a planned gift with the Carnegie Institution.  This type of gift can be tailored to meet your individual needs.

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A charitable remainder trust provides you and/or another beneficiary with income for life or for a specified period of time. Thereafter the trust distributes the remaining assets to the Carnegie Institution. A trust of this kind can be tailored to meet your individual needs.

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A charitable lead trust provides a stream of income to the Carnegie Institution for a pre-determined period and thereafter distributes the remaining assets to family members or other heirs that you have named.

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Assets from an employer’s pension or profit-sharing plan, or from other retirement plans such as an IRA or a Keogh plan, offer another option for remembering the Carnegie Institution in your estate plans.

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You may also designate the Carnegie Institution as the beneficiary of an existing or new life insurance policy. This kind of gift will allow you to make a significant contribution to the Carnegie Institution without a large cash outlay.

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To understand the differences and benefits of these planned giving options, see this comparison chart.

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Lifetime Giving Societies

 

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The Carnegie Institution for Science respects the privacy of all donors. We believe in safeguarding personal information and ensuring that donor privacy is protected.

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We would not expect a baby to join a team or participate in social situations that require sophisticated communication. Yet, most developmental biologists have assumed that young cells, only recently born from stem cells and known as “progenitors,” are already competent at inter-...

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Washington, D.C—The MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team is launching a competition this week to name...

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Hydrogen is the most-abundant element in the cosmos. With only a single electron per atom, it is deceptively simple. As a result, hydrogen has been a testing ground for theories of the chemical bond since the birth of quantum mechanics a century ago.

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We would not expect a baby to join a team or participate in social situations that require sophisticated communication.

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A good place to begin research in our archives is with our online databases, located here:

<http://www.ciw.edu/publications/archives>

and with our online finding aids

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The Administration Files of the Carnegie Institution contain correspondence, press coverage, reports, financial records, and administrative records of the institution.

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Since its inception in 1902, the Carnegie Institution has published over 600 volumes listed in its Monograph Series (297KB PDF).

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As one of the first privately funded scientific research organizations in the United States, the Carnegie Institution, established over 100 years ago, recognizes the importance of preserving its documentary heritage.

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Contains president's commentary, essays from the directors of Carnegie's five research departments, and the institution's financial report. 88 pages. Published in January 2001. Soft cover.

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Contains president's commentary, essays from the directors of Carnegie's five research departments, and the institution's financial report. 144 pages. Published in January 2000. Soft cover. Previous editions are also available.

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Contains president's commentary, essays from the directors of Carnegie's five research departments, and the institution's financial report. 94 pages. Published in January 2002. Soft cover. Previous editions are also available.

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Contains president's commentary, essays from the directors of Carnegie's six research departments, and the institution's financial report. 115 pages. Published in June 2005. Soft cover. Previous editions are also available.

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Contains president's commentary, essays from the directors of Carnegie's six research departments, and the institution's financial report. 102 pages. Published in January 2003. Soft cover. Previous editions are also available.

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Contains president's commentary, essays from the directors of Carnegie's six research departments, and the institution's financial report. 104 pages. Published in March 2004. Soft cover. Previous editions are also available.

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Dr. Douglas Koshland,
University of California Berkeley, Department of Molecular & Cell Biology

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The Broad Branch Road Neighborhood Lectures provide an opportunity to get up close and personal with Carnegie scientists at our campus in northwest Washington DC. These lectures begin at 6:30 p.m. and last for approximately one hour, followed by a brief question and answer period.

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Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity without any resistance. It can only be found in certain materials, and even then it can only be achieved under specific temperature and pressure conditions.

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Fast radio bursts are quick, bright flashes of radio waves from an unknown source in space. They are a mysterious phenomenon that last only a few milliseconds, and until now they have not been observed in real time.

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Fast radio bursts are quick, bright flashes of radio waves from an unknown source in space. They are mysterious and last only a few milliseconds, and  have not been observed in real time until now.

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A variety of seminars and conferences are held at each of the departments and at the headquarters building in Washington, D.C. For department information see the links below.

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Modern science began with Copernicus speculating that the Earth is a planet and that all the planets orbit the Sun. Bruno followed up by speculating that the Sun is a star, that other stars have planets, and other planets are inhabited by life.

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Anat Shahar was awarded the Clarke Award of the Geochemical Society. It is awarded to an early-career scientist for " a single outstanding contribution to geochemistry or cosmochemistry, published either as a single paper or a series of papers on a single topic. "

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Erik Hauri, who studies how planetary processes affect the chemistry of the Earth, Moon and other objects, was made a fellow of both the Geochemical Society and European Association of Geochemistry.

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Administration

Office of the President

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The Carnegie Institution is an endowed, independent, nonprofit institution. Significant additional support comes from federal grants and private donations. Its fiscal year is between July 1 and June 30.

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Washington, D.C.— A team of Carnegie scientists have found “beautifully preserved” 15 million-year-old thin protein sheets in fossil shells from southern Maryland.

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The light we see with our eyes only tells a small part of...

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Washington, D.C.— Charity Navigator, America's largest charity evaluator, has ranked the Carnegie Institution for Science with its highest rating, four stars, for “sound fiscal management and commitment to accountability and transparency” for the fourteenth consecutive year.

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February 11, 2015

Dr. Douglas Koshland,
University of California Berkeley, Department of Molecular & Cell Biology

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Scientific literacy is now recognized to be crucial for our nation's progress in the 21st century.

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Fifty years ago, Americans led the world in math and science, claiming some of the most important inventions and technological breakthroughs of the 20th century.  Today, American 15-year-olds rank 25th in math compared to their peers worldwide.  Math ƒor America DC strives to recla

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Carnegie is renowned for its post-doctoral and graduate student fellowship programs, which operate on each of the Carnegie campuses.

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Washington, D.C.— Educators from the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE), a division of the Carnegie Institution for Science

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Washington, D.C.— Quasars--supermassive black holes found at the center of distant massive galaxies--are the most-luminous beacons in the sky.

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie’s Robert Hazen has been awarded a $1.4 million grant from the W.M.

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March 4, 2015

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The Carnegie Institution administration building is located at 1530 P St., NW, Washington, D.C., at the corner of 16th and P Streets. The building is open from 8:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The entrance is on the P St., side.

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If you want to receive the print materials, please fill out the form below. If you want the material electronically, please click here.

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Since the Carnegie Institution was funded by Andrew Carnegie, why does it need contributions?
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Dr. Barrett is chairman and president of BASIS Schools, Inc., and an operator of charter schools in Arizona, Texas, and Washington, DC.

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Baltimore, MD—The newest member of the staff at the Carnegie Department of Embryology, Junior Investigator Zhao Zhang, received the prestigious Larry Sandler Memorial Award at the 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference of the Genetics Society of America in Chicago the first week of Marc

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Washington, D.C.-Two new papers from members of the MESSENGER Science Team provide global-scale maps of Mercury’s surface chemistry that reveal previously unrecognized geochemical terranes — large regions that have compositions distinct from their surroundings.

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Washington, D.C.— In the face of global climate change, increasing the use of renewable energy resou

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Humans have a longer childhood than any other animal—our children are more vulnerable and dependent than other species’ infants. Why is this so? In the last thirty years there has been a revolution in our scientific understanding of infants and young children. Dr.

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Black holes remain among the most enigmatic objects in the universe. Using both computer simulations and traditional analytic theory, Dr.

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The expanding universe was discovered at Mount Wilson almost 100 years ago. But there is something new! In the past 20 years, astronomers have found that cosmic expansion is speeding up, driven by a mysterious “dark energy” whose nature we do not understand. Dr.

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Nutrition and metabolism are closely linked with reproductive health. Several reproductive disorders have been linked to malnutrition, diabetes, and obesity. Furthermore, fasting in numerous species can result in decreased fertility. New work from a Carnegie team focuses on the accumulation of...

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To combat global climate change caused by greenhouse gases, alternative energy sources and other types of environmental recourse actions are needed. There are several proposals that involve using vertical ocean pipes to move seawater to the surface from the depths in order to reap a variety of...

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Silicon dioxide, commonly called silica, is one of the most-abundant natural compounds and a major component of the Earth’s crust and mantle.  Silica’s various high-pressure forms make it an often-used study subject for scientists interested in the transition between different...

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Inside every seed is the embryo of a plant, and in most cases also a storage of food needed to power initial growth of the young seedling. If not enough food is delivered from the leaves to the seed, the seeds won’t have the energy to grow when it’s time to germinate. New work from a...

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Silicon dioxide, commonly called silica, is one of the most-abundant natural compounds and a major component of the Earth’s crust and mantle.

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A Carnegie-based search of nearby galaxies for their oldest stars has uncovered two stars in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy that were born shortly after the galaxy formed, approximately 13 billion years ago. The Sculptor dwarf is a small galaxy that orbits around our own Milky Way, just as the Moon...

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A Carnegie-based search of nearby galaxies for their oldest stars has uncovered two stars in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy that were born shortly after the galaxy formed, approximately 13 billion years ago.

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Washington, D.C.— Timothy Doyle, Associate Dean for Finance and CFO for Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) will join the Carnegie Institution for Science as Chief Operating Officer on April 15, 2015.

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Nutrition and metabolism are closely linked with reproductive health. Several reproductive disorders have been linked to malnutrition, diabetes, and obesity. Furthermore, fasting in numerous species can result in decreased fertility.

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In the face of global climate change, increasing the use of renewable energy resources is one of the most urgent challenges facing the world.

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Why do we look like our parents? We inherit particular versions of genes that shape our growth.

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The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling aspen forests died as a result of this drought. It is based on damage to an individual...

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Research from Carnegie's William Anderegg (now at Princeton University), Joseph Berry, and Christopher Field is featured in this public radio piece. 

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The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling aspen forests died as a result of this drought.

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Two new papers from members of the MESSENGER Science Team provide global-scale maps of Mercury’s surface chemistry that reveal previously unrecognized geochemical terranes — large regions that have compositions distinct from their surroundings.

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Thank you for your generous gift in support of the Carnegie Institution for Science. We sincerely appreciate your assistance in sustaining the Carnegie tradition of providing our exceptional scientists with the opportunity to pursue highly original work.

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Carnegie News Letter

Contains articles featuring the research of the scientists of the institution, as well as current programs and events. Published three times a year.

 

Mo.

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Cells often face low-oxygen conditions at night. When this happens, some organisms such as the single-cell alga Chlamydomonas are able to generate cellular energy from the breakdown of sugars without taking up oxygen.Although critical to the survival of common aquatic and terrestrial organis

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Junior investigator Zhao Zhang joined Carnegie in November 2014.

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A plant's roots grow and spread into the soil, taking up necessary water and minerals. The tip of a plant's root is a place of active cell division followed by cell elongation, with different zones all working together to expand into new depths of the soil. Achieving an optimal root...

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Educators from the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE), a division of the Carnegie Institution for Science, joined the District of Columbia Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) in welcoming partners of the newly launched DC STEM Network to Carnegie’s Washington...

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"Then about a decade ago, Carlson found room for doubt, after comparing Earth rocks and space rocks using better instruments..." ...
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Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Institution to support individuals of exceptional ability and passion and give them the independence to pursue high-risk, high-reward science. 

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Ken Caldeira warns against the use of geoengineering, calls research into it an "act of desperation on the part of scientists." Read more

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Since its inception in 1902, the Carnegie Institution has published over 600 volumes listed in its Monograph Series...

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Washington, D.C. – Carnegie Science announces the launch of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory-3 (CAO-3), the most scientifically advanced aircraft-based mapping and data analytics system in civil aviation today.

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Washington, DC— New work from Carnegie’s Russell Hemley and Ivan Naumov hones in on the physics underlying the recently discovered fact that some metals stop being metallic under pressure. Their work is published in Physical Review Letters.

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A plant's roots grow and spread into the soil, taking up necessary water and minerals. The tip of a plant's root is a place of active cell division followed by cell elongation, with different zones all working together to expand into new depths of the soil.

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Stanford, CA— Carnegie’s David Ehrhardt has been awarded an honorary fellowship of the Royal Microscopical Society. It was announced during the society’s Botanical Microscopy 2015 meeting at Exeter University.

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Carnegie's John Mulchaey talks to NPR's Morning Edition about Edwin Hubble's work at the Mount Wilson Obeservatory and his famous Andromeda plates. Read more

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Mitotic proteins take on editorial duties in this writeup of new work from Yixian Zheng's lab in The Journal of Cell Biology. More 

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Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming.

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Pasadena, CA- John Mulchaey has been appointed the new Crawford H. Greenewalt Director of the Carnegie Observatories. He is the eleventh director of the historic department, which was founded in 1904.

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Washington, D.C.— Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming.

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Washington, D.C.—Joseph A. Berry, staff scientist at Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates.

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Washington, D.C—The MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team, coordinated through Carnegie Science, announces the winning names from its competition  to name five impact craters on Mercury.

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A team has, for the first time, discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymer fibers.

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Artificially manipulating Arctic climate by 'whitening' the ocean's surface to reflect sunlight back into space will fail, Carnegie's Ken Caldeira tells The Independent.

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Deputy Principal Investigator on NASA’s MESSENGER mission to Mercury, Carnegie’s Larry Nittler is playing a leading role in determining the chemical composition of the Solar System’s innermost planet.

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Carnegie's Larry Nittler, deputy principal investigator for the MESSENGER mission, talks to BBC News about its crash into Mercury and all we've learned from the mission. More

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Mongabay covers the launch of Greg Asner's third-generation Carnegie Airborne Observatory, and the possiblity that he'll tackle mapping in drought-stricken California and Malaysian Borneo.

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Two nights ago, for the first time in history, astronomers from University of Arizona and Carnegie's Yuri Beletsky at Las Campanas Observatory used the Clay Magellan telescope together with Magellan Adaptive Optics (MagAO) to look at the sky through an eyepiece at the full diffraction limit...

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A Carnegie Evening Lecture

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Washington, DC— New work from a team including Carnegie’s Christopher Glein has revealed the pH of water spewing from a geyser-like plume on Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

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The ocean on Saturn's moon Enceladus may have a potential energy source to support life, according to research from a team led by Christopher Glein. More

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Washington, D.C.— Carbonates are a group of minerals that contain the carbonate ion (CO32-) and a metal, such as iron or magnesium.

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Washington, DC— The top-three students in this year’s DC STEM Fair are currently in Pittsburgh competing at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, the world’s largest pre-college science competition, organized by the Society for Science & the

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Type Ia supernovae are violent stellar explosions that shine as some of the brightest objects in the universe. But there are still many mysteries surrounding their origin—what kind of star system they originate in and how the explosions begin.

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Type Ia supernovae are violent stellar explosions that shine as some of the brightest objects in the universe. But there are still many mysteries surrounding their origin—what kind of star system they originate in and how the explosions begin. New work from the intermediate Palomar...

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You know the old saying: Location, location, location? It turns out that it applies to the Amazon rainforest, too. New work illustrates a hidden tapestry of chemical variation across the lowland Peruvian Amazon.

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You know the old saying: Location, location, location? It turns out that it applies to the Amazon rainforest, too. New work illustrates a hidden tapestry of chemical variation across the lowland Peruvian Amazon.

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To combat global climate change caused by greenhouse gases, alternative energy sources and other types of environmental recourse actions are needed.

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Washington, DC— Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity—maintain a flow of electrons—without any resistance. It can only be found in certain materials, and even then it can only be achieved under controlled

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In the face of global climate change, increasing the use of renewable energy resources is one of the most urgent challenges facing the world.

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Greg Asner is interviewed for American Scientist's Sightings column, discusses the logistics and benefits of research using remote sensing technology. More

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New work from a multidisciplinary team of scientists used massive DNA sequencing of bacterial populations that grow in the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park to determine their genetic diversity and explore the underlying evolutionary dynamics.

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New work from a multidisciplinary team of scientists used massive DNA sequencing of bacterial populations that grow in the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park to determine their genetic diversity and explore the underlying evolutionary dynamics. They found an unexpectedly high degree of...

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This artwork shows the Giant Magellan Telesope at Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.

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The heat generated by burning a fossil fuel is surpassed within a few months by the warming caused by the release of its carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, according to new work from Carnegie’s Xiaochun Zhang and Ken Caldeira published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journ

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Washington, DC—The heat generated by burning a fossil fuel is surpassed within a few months by the warming caused by the release of its carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, according to new work from Carnegie’s Xiaochun Zhang and Ken Caldeira published in Geophysic

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Pasadena, CA— The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) has passed a major milestone as 11 international partnersincluding Carnegieapproved its construction, which secures the project’s future and unlocks more than $500 million

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New work from Carnegie’s Russell Hemley and Ivan Naumov hones in on the physics underlying the recently discovered fact that some metals stop being metallic under pressure.

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Dr. John Mulchaey
Staff Scientist
Carnegie Observatories

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Dr. Matthew P. Scott

President,

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The Washington Post covers research from Ken Caldeira and Xiaochun Zhang, which compares warming from fossil fuel combustion with warming caused by the carbon dioxide released by the burning process.  ...

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Allan Spradling offers input to The Scientist on a paper about female Japanese rice fish producing sperm. More

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Washington, DC— The matter that makes up distant planets and even-more-distant stars exists under extreme pressure and temperature conditions.

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Washington, DC— Carnegie’s Zhiyong Wang will receive the Humboldt Research Award, one of Germany’s most-prestigious prizes.

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The interiors of several of our Solar System’s planets and moons are icy, and ice has been found on distant extrasolar planets, as well.  But these bodies aren’t filled with the regular kind of water ice that you avoid on the sidewalk in winter.

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Washington, DC—The interiors of several of our Solar System’s planets and moons are icy, and ice has been found on distant extrasolar planets, as well.  But these bodies aren’t filled with the regular kind of water ice that you avoid on the sidewalk in wint

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A documentary film about Eric Kandel by Petra Seeger FilmForm Köln, 2008

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New work from Carnegie’s Alan Boss offers a potential solution to a longstanding problem in the prevailing theory of how rocky planets formed in our own Solar System, as well as in others.

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Washington, DC— New work from Carnegie’s Alan Boss offers a potential solution to a longstanding problem in the prevailing theory of how rocky planets formed in our own Solar System, as well as in others.

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Modern tomatoes lack the intense flavor of heirloom, grown-in-your-back-yard varieties. What exactly is “tomato flavor”? Where did it go and what can we do about it? We believe that better flavor leads directly to better, healthier food choices.

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Colossal magnetoresistance is a property with practical applications in a wide array of electronic tools including magnetic sensors and magnetic RAM.

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Tiny beads of volcanic glass found on the lunar surface during the Apollo missions are a sign that fire fountain eruptions took place on the Moon’s surface.

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Climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions will alter the way that Americans heat and cool their homes.

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New work from an international team of researchers including Carnegie’s Lara Wagner improves our understanding of the geological activity that is thought to have formed the Rocky Mountains.

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Baltimore, MD—Carnegie’s BioEYES K-12 science educational program launches a new center sponsored by the University of Utah, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Research Enterprise.

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Scientists, including Carnegie’s David Ehrhardt and Heather Cartwright, have exploited a way to watch protein trafficking to make cellulose in the formation of plant cell walls in real time.

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Alexander Goncharov's experiment on noble gases could give new insight into the interiors of gas giant planets says Scientific American. More

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With the New Horizons historic flyby of Pluto next week, imagine how excited we were a few weeks ago to unearth a set of plates from 1925 in our vault that include Pluto--five years before Pluto was discovered.

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Continuing current carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends throughout this century and beyond would leave a legacy of heat and acidity in the deep ocean.

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Carnegie trustees can access board meeting materials and more by logging into this secure page.

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In 1903 the Carnegie Institution established a Desert Laboratory to explore the properties of desert plants. From that humble stone building in Tucson, Arizona, eventually emerged our spectacular Department of Plant Biology on the Stanford University campus and, by descent, our Department of...

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The Amazon rainforest might seem like a massive expanse of monotonous green.

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Slate's Bad Astronomy says a photo of Orion's M43 nebula by Carnegie's Yuri Beletsky and Igor Chilingarian of the Harvard–Smithsoni

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Kavli Prize Laureate Lecture - The Restless Brain 

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The Curiosity rover has been exploring Mars for more than three years, measuring the past and present habitability potential of our nearest planetary neighbor.

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Earth's 4.5 billion year history is a complex tale of deterministic physical and chemical processes, as well as "frozen accidents". Most models of life's origins also invoke chance and necessity. Recent research adds two important insights to this discussion.

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The financial collapse of 2009 brought with it major changes in the economic, political, as well as media landscape.

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Ben Shappee, Hubble, Carnegie-Princeton Fellow, summarizes results for the Shappee et al.

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Washington, D.C.—Chris Field, the founding director of Carnegie Science’s Department of Global Ecology, will be awarded the fifth annual Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication by Climate One at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco.

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Washington, D.C.—Carnegie investigator Greg Asner has been elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He is one of 60 new members.

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Stanford, CA—Wolf B. Frommer, Director of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology, has been elected as a member of the German Academy of Sciences, Leopoldina, one of the world’s oldest national academies.

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To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the first discovery of exoplanets - planets around other sun-like stars - the Carnegie Institution for Science and the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program are hosting a special program, highlighting prominent scientists connected to the discovery

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Washington, DC—Continuing current carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends throughout this century and beyond would leave a legacy of heat and acidity in the deep ocean.

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Stop burning fossil fuels now: there is no CO2 'technofix', scientists warn More

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Washington, DC— Climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions will alter the way that Americans heat and cool their homes.

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Climate change could give San Francisco the climate index of San Diego and New York City the climate index of Oklahoma City, according to new research from Ken Caldeira and high school intern Yana Petri covered by the Washington Post.

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Alan Boss, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism
The Search for New Solar Systems
May 6, 2004

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Washington, DC—Colossal magnetoresistance is a property with practical applications in a wide array of electronic tools including magnetic sensors and magnetic RAM.

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New work from an international team of researchers including Carnegie’s Lara Wagner improves our understanding of the geological activity that is thought to have formed the Rocky Mountains. It is published by ...

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Frederick Tan holds a unique position at Embryology in this era of high-throughput sequencing where determining DNA and RNA sequences has become one of the most powerful technologies in biology. DNA provides the basic code shared by all our cells to program our development.

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New work from Carnegie's Alan Boss and Sandra Keiser provides surprising new details about the trigger that may have started the earliest phases of planet formation in our solar system.

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Washington, DC— New work from Carnegie's Alan Boss and Sandra Keiser provides surprising new details about the trigger that may have started the earliest phases of planet formation in our solar system. It is published by The Astrophysical Journal.

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Are today’s minerals a predictable consequence of the planet’s chemical makeup? Or are they the result of chance events?

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Plants form a vast network of below-ground roots that search soil for needed resources. The structure and function of this root network can be highly adapted to particular environments. Excavation of root systems reveals these kinds of adaptations but is laborious, time consuming, and does...

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Science Magazine talks to Alan Boss about how Jupiter and Saturn may have formed. More

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Daily Mail: A shockwave from a catastrophic supernova explosion may have triggered the birth of our Solar System when it crashed into a cloud of gas.

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Washington, DC— Tiny beads of volcanic glass found on the lunar surface during the Apollo missions are a sign that fire fountain eruptions took place on the Moon’s surface.

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Carnegie Family of Institutions Pays Tribute to Andrew Carnegie’s Legacy of Philanthropy

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The ancient lunar surface once erupted with geysers of lava — and now, a team of scientists including Carnegie's Erik Hauri think they know what caused those fiery fountains. More

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New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.

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Washington, DC—New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.

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Pasadena, CA— Astronomer and instrumentation expert Stephen Shectman of the Carnegie Observatories has been selected to receive the Maria and Eric Muhlmann Award from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, “for important research results based upon development of groundbreaking inst

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How did a leafy tract on the rural fringe of Washington a century ago become home to a world-class think tank for scientific research?

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Minerals record information that is vital to our understanding of Earth’s formation and evolution. Join me as I take you on a journey to explore a group of minerals that form from magmas.

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The Moon has been an object of mystery, curiosity, wonder, observation, fascination and speculation since the dawn of mankind.

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New work from a team including Carnegie’s Christopher Glein has revealed the pH of water spewing from a geyser-like plume on Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

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As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth. New work from a team including three Carnegie scientists demonstrates...

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On SFGate: Carnegie's José Dinneny uses firefly proteins to light up certain plants and reveal root system behavior. More

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“I think there are definitely things out there bigger than Pluto that are yet to be discovered,” Scott Sheppard talks to The Washington Post about the possibility of an undiscovered outer Solar System "disturber."...

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Popular Mechanics: Clyde Tombaugh still discovered the dwarf planet, but this is the latest "precovery" image to be unearthed. More

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 “It’s like going in and getting a blood test, and the doctor saying you’re OK or you’re not,” Greg Asner tells The Guardian of his Carnegie Airborne Observatory team's monitoring of drought-stricken forests in California.

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Washington, DC—New work from an international team including Carnegie’s Ken Caldeira demonstrates that the planet’s remaining fossil fuel resources would be sufficient to melt nearly all of Antarctica if burned, leading to a 50- or 60-meter (160- to 200-foot) ri

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“This is humanity as a geologic force,” Ken Caldeira tells the New York Times.

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“The legacy of what we’re doing over the next decades and the next centuries is really going to have a dramatic influence on this planet for many tens of thousands of years,” Ken Caldeira tells The Washington Post.

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"It’s true that right now our fossil-fuel resources remain vast; but it’s also true that, if we keep burning through them at current rates, they’ll be gone in less time than it took for the Roman Empire to rise and fall. If earlier societies had done what we’re d

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Washington Post gardening columnist, Adrian Higgins, writes about the quest for the perfect tomato and this month's Capital Science Evening speaker, Harry Klee of the University of Florida Horticultural Sciences Department.

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Every high school biology class learns about the process of mitosis, the series of steps through which a cell divides itself into two daughter cells, each with the same genetic material. Mitosis involves copying or “replicating” each of the cell’s DNA-containing chromosomes,...

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This image show the location of areas affected by the Chilean earthquake this week. Carnegies Las Campanas Observatory is located at the black star abut 300 mile north of Santiago.

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"Two physical realities virtually ensure that Californians will still face drought, regardless of how this El Niño unfolds," write Department of Global Ecology Director Chris Field and Stanford's Noah Diffenbaugh in the New York Times Opinion pages.

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Postdoctoral fellows are the lifeblood of Carnegie Science. Unlike many research establishments, where postdocs work in a hierarchy, Carnegie postdocs work alongside senior scientists collaborating and contributing equally, while also being mentored. They are truly the core workforce.

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A unique airborne observatory measures the drought stress in California at 8 million trees per hour...more

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Anthony Piro is the George Ellery Hale Distinguished Scholar in Theoretical Astrophysics at the Carnegie Observatories. He is a theoretical astrophysicist studying compact objects, astrophysical explosions, accretion flows, and stellar dynamics.

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Gwen Rudie studies the chemical and physical properties of very distant galaxies and their surrounding gas in order to further our understanding of the processes that are central to the formation and development of galaxies. Critical to this research is our ability to trace the raw mate

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Andrew Newman works in several areas in extragalactic astronomy, including the distribution of dark matter--the mysterious, invisible  matter that makes up most of the universe--on galaxies, the evolution of the structure and dynamics of massive early galaxies including dwarf galaxies, ellip

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Peter Driscoll studies the evolution of Earth’s core and magnetic field including magnetic pole reversal. Over the last 20 million or so years, the north and south magnetic poles on Earth have reversed about every 200,000, to 300,000 years and is now long overdue.

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Peter van Keken studies the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth. In particularly he looks at the causes and consequences of plate tectonics; element modeling of mantle convection,  and the dynamics of subduction zones--locations where one tectonic plate slides under another.

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Carnegie’s Arthur Grossman teamed up with engineers at Stanford University (including Fritz Prinz and graduate students Zubin Huang and Witchukorn Phuthong) to develop atomic force microscopy to determine the structures of photosynthetic complexes within the spinach chlorophyll-...

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Yuri Beletsky's recent image of  the lunar eclipse at  Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory has been published by NASA as the Astronomy Picture of the Day, October 1, 2015.

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Martin Jonikas of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology and Zhao Zhang of the Department of Embryology, have been awarded the New Innovator and Early Independence Awards, respectively, from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Scientists, including Carnegie’s David Ehrhardt and Heather Cartwright, have exploited a way to watch protein trafficking to make cellulose in the formation of plant cell walls in real time.

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“The system produces maps that tell us more about an ecosystem in a single airborne overpass than what might be achieved in a lifetime of work on the ground,” Greg Asner tells National Geographic in their special Climate Change Issue.  ...

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Stanford, CA— Like humans, plants are surrounded by and closely associated with microbes. The majority of these microbes are beneficial, but some can cause devastating disease. Maintaining the balance between them is critical.

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Washington, DC—The DC STEM Network invites local science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professionals to join 350 experts from national organizations devoted to STEM education, policy, and industry at its summit on November 5 at Gallaudet University.

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With mounting vigor for combating global climate change, increasing the use of renewable energy resources such as solar, without compromising natural habitats...

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The American Society for Cell Biology profiles Yixian Zheng and her recent papers on the elusive spindle matrix.

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"I started to wonder if I could design a course that encouraged freshmen to recognize the beauty and wealth of trees on campus?

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Washington, DC— Protected areas, such as nature reserves and national parks, play a crucial role in sheltering wildlife, such as African elephants, from hunting and habitat destruction.

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Impacts of Large Herbivores on Vegetation: publications from the journals Ecography and Publications of the National Academy of Sciences

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"Some of the scariest prospects from a changing clime involve conditions completely outside the range of human experience," Department of Global Ecology Director Chris Field tells the Associated Press.

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Stanford, CA— Once a mother plant releases its embryos to the outside world, they have to survive on their own without family protection.

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Scientists, including researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science, discuss the search for extrasolar planets.

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Solar power developers in California have been using mostly undeveloped desert lands with sensitive wildlife habitat as sites for new solar power installations. Areas that have already been developed and have little wildlife habitat would be better suited for solar development Rebecca R.

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On November 12, 2015, students from ConneXions Academy will address water-quality issues in Baltimore through the General Motors Global Rivers Environmental Education Network (GM GREEN) managed by the Earth Force program, part of Carnegie’s BioEYES’ program.

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Not only did our early Solar System potentially consist of five or even six giant worlds, but there may have been a large number of inner, terrestrial planets that were ejected back in the Solar System’s infancy.

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A pair of researchers have new evidence to support a link between cyclical comet showers and mass extinctions, including the one that they believe wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

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Washington, D.C. — Last Thursday, the DC STEM Network, collaboration between the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) and Carnegie Academy of Science Education (CASE) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, hosted the inaugural DC STEM Summit.

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“We can’t explain these objects’ orbits from what we know about the solar system,” says Carnegie's Scott Sheppard in Science Magazine's coverage of his announcement at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

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Leading scientists, senior officials, and supporters from an international consortium of universities and research institutions are gathering on a remote mountaintop high in the Chilean Andes today to celebrate groundbreaking for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT).

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Share this video with the hashtag #chlamy
Get your very own Sammy The Chlamy plush doll!! www.livedreamcreate.com
Learn more about research in the Jonikas Lab: http://bit.ly/jonikas

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Kids Talk STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) at Carnegie Science. Sign up for communications

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STEM Education: STEM Experts Reflect on the mentors who made a difference in their lives.Sign up for communications

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Karl Reid the Executive Director of the National Society of Black Engineers, What works for the Underrepresented. Sign...

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Read this new flipbook of Carnegie Science to find out how experts in STEM education believe STEM professionals can advance STEM. Sign up...

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Stanford, CA—Everyone who took high school biology learned that photosynthesis is the process by which plants, algae and select bacteria transform the Sun's energy into chemical energy during the daytime.

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This video was part of the 2015 Open House at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, CA,.

We show plates from 1894 to 1971, how they were made at Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories, and it depicts the astronomers who took the data. 

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New observations from an international geophysics team, including Carnegie’s Lara Wagner, suggest that the standard belief that the Earth’s rigid tectonic plates stay strong when they slide under another plate and sink into the deep Earth may not be universal. Instead, the new work...

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Mr. Wais is president of Marwais International LLC, based in Luxembourg.  He spent many years working in his family’s various steel companies, including Caine Steel of Chicago and Pinole Point Steel Co.

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Washington, DC— As astronomers continue to find more and more planets around stars beyond our own Sun, they are trying to discover patterns and features that indicate what types of planets are likely to form around different kinds of stars.

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Katie Lapp is Harvard University's Executive Vice President.  In this role, she is responsible for the financial, administrative, and operational aspects of the University and is a member of the president's senior management team.

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What is the secret link between rocks and minerals, and every living thing on earth?
Four and a half billion years ago, the young Earth was a hellish place—a seething chaos of meteorite impacts, volcanoes belching noxious gases, and lightning flashing through a thin...

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San Diego, CA— Ghosts are not your typical cell biology research subjects.

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“I started out thinking that it was all about information, and if we only got the right information to the right people, then the right things would happen,” Carnegie's Ken Caldeira tells WIRED Magazine.

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Now is the perfect moment for satellites to start measuring biodiversity, Carnegie's Greg Asner tells Mongabay. “It’s the perfect storm of conditions,” he says. More

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50 years after the first U.S. president was warned about climate change, it is "the defining issue of our time," Department of Global Ecology Director Chris Field told attendees. More

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Dan Rather interveiws Chris Field, director of Global Ecology, about climate change. The interview was published by the Huffington Post.

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Washington, DC— A team made up almost entirely of current and former Carnegie scientists has discovered a highly unusual planetary system comprised of a Sun-like star, a dwarf star, and an enormous planet sandwiched in between.
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Stanford, CA—Carnegie’s Alexander Jones will receive the Tansley Medal for Excellence in Plant Science. The honor includes publishing a short review, an editorial written about his work in the journal New Phytologist, and a small bursary.

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We are missing aat least 145 carbon-bearing minerals and you can help find them.

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Deck the Halls

Our newly renovated hall has state-of-the-art audio visual and broadcast capabilities. The restoration preserved all of its beautiful, historic aspects. Carnegie' new logo captures the span of our science: Space, Life, Earth.

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Washington, DC—California’s forests are home to the planet’s oldest, tallest and most-massive trees.

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CBS Evening News covers Greg Asner and the Carnegie Airborne Observatory team's work on the impact the drought has had on California's forests. The team found that 888 million trees have seen measurable water loss, and predicts that 58 million are on the brink of death.

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Pasadena, CA— New work from a team of astronomers led by Carnegie’s Jennifer van Saders indicates that one recently developed method for determining a star’s age needs to be recalibrated for stars that are older than our Sun.

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Standing strong and silent, plants are all around us, both shaping our world and responding to it.  Plants can live for hundreds, if not thousands of years, continuously renewing themselves through active stem cells, yet also avoiding cancer.

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The MESSENGER spacecraft, the first to orbit the planet Mercury, overcame many technical challenges to survive the harsh environment of the inner...

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What do fish fossils tell us about the human body? How can scientists predict where to find transitional fossils. Dr. Shubin will take us from the anatomy laboratory to the Arctic of Canada in search of answers.

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The genome editing system called CRISPR earned Science magazine’s “2015 Breakthrough of the Year.” The advent of facile genome engineering using the bacterial RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system in animals and plants is transforming biology.

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Smithsonian Magazine talks Bob Hazen about "Life's Rocky Start" the NOVA special that features his work on mineral evolution and ecology. “We see this intertwined co-evolution of the geosphere and biosphere,” says Hazen.

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A team of astronomers, including Carnegie’s Benjamin Shappee, Nidia Morrell, and Ian Thompson, has discovered the most-luminous supernova ever observed, called ASAS-SN-15lh. It is two times more luminous than any supernova previously discovered. In...

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NPR covers the discovery of the most-luminous supernova by a team of astronomers, including Ben Shappee. More

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"Supernovae shape the universe we live in and there are still many unanswered questions about these explosions, even for the common ones," Ben Shappee tells The Washington Post about the most-luminous supernova ever observed.

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"Estimates range as high as there being one habitable Earth-like planet for every star in our galaxy. As someone who has lived through the ups and downs of the history of the field of planet formation and detection, this revelation never fails to amaze me, and often chokes me up when gi

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Through late February, five planets will align in early morning sky, and can be seen unaided. Jackie Faherty tells NPR it is like the planetary Academy Awards.

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“It was probably the runt of the family,” Scott Sheppard tells the L.A. Times of the theorized ninth planet.

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Jackie Faherty talks to Runner's World about spotting Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and Jupiter during a single early morning run. More 

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Metabolic diseases like diabetes and obesity are closely linked with several female reproductive disorders. A team of Carnegie biologists homes in on how eggs store fuel for embryonic development what this can teach us about female infertility. 

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Matthew Sieber, a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Embryology, has been honored for his extraordinary accomplishments, through a new program that recognizes exceptional Carnegie postdoctoral scholars who have demonstrated both scientific accomplishments and creative endeavors beyond...

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Washington, D.C.—Earth's magnetic field is generated by the motion of liquid iron in the planet's core. This “geodynamo” occasionally reverses its polarity—the magnetic north and south poles swap places.

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Metallic glasses are at the frontier of materials science research. They have been made by rapidly cooling alloys of various metals including, zirconium, palladium, iron, titanium, and copper, and used for a variety of applications from making golf clubs to aerospace construction. But much about...

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The world’s 2500 rarest minerals have now been categorised for the first time, revealing intriguing implications.

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"What is most astonishing about rare minerals is that the processes that ultimately forms most of them comes from biology," Bob Hazen tells the Los Angeles Times. "As life changes near the surface of our planet, it creates new conditions that leads to the creation of thousands

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Washington, DC— A team of scientists including Carnegie’s Dina Bower and Andrew Steele weigh in on whether microstructures found in 3.46 billion-year-old samples of a silica-rich rock called chert found in Western Australia are the planet’s oldest fossils.

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Planet Labs contributes an essay to Medium about Greg Asner and the Carnegie Airborne Observatory using LiDAR and satellite imagery to map the California drought, calls the CAO "a fire-fighter of a different kind."...

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Washington, DC— More than 1,000 scientists from nonprofit, corporate, academic, and private institutions say public doubts about genetically modified food crops are hindering the next Green Revolution.

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A team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Rebecca Albright and Ken Caldeira performed the first-ever experiment that manipulated seawater chemistry in a natural coral reef community in order to determine the effect that excess carbon dioxide released by human activity is having on coral reefs.

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"If drought conditions continue or reoccur, even with temporary reprieves such as El Niño, we predict substantial future forest change," Greg Asner says in The Huffington Post.

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Washington, DC— A team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Rebecca Albright and Ken Caldeira performed the first-ever experiment that manipulated seawater chemistry in a natural coral reef community in order to determine the effect that excess carbon dioxide released by h

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Baltimore, MD—New work from Carnegie’s Allan Spradling and Lei Lei demonstrates that mammalian egg cells gain crucial cellular components at an early stage from their undifferentiated sister cells, called germ cells.

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Take a tour with Cynthia Hunt through eight foundational images from the Carnegie Observatories' plate collection in Nautilus magazine. More

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During the daytime, plants convert the Sun’s energy into sugars using photosynthesis, a complex, multi-stage biochemical process. New work from a team including Carnegie’s Mark Heinnickel, Wenqiang Yang, and Arthur Grossman identified a protein needed for assembling the...

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USA Today reports on a first-of-its-kind experiment led by Rebecca Albright and  Ken Caldeira that found ocean acidification caused by global warming is already slowing growth of the world’s coral reefs.

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How big a role does ocean acidification play in the sickly state of many coral reefs?

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Stanford, CA— You’ve probably seen news stories about the highly lauded, much-discussed genome editing system CRISPR/Cas9. But did you know the system was actually derived from bacteria, which use it to fight off foreign invaders such as viruses?

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Scientists have long been puzzled by Mercury’s very dark surface. Previously, scientists proposed that the darkness came from carbon accumulated by comet impacts. Now scientists, including Carnegie’s Larry Nittler, confirm that carbon is present at Mercury’s surface, but that...

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Washington, D.C.—For the first time scientists have looked at the net balance of the three major greenhouse gases—carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide—for every region of Earth’s landmasses.

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For 45 years, the Las Campanas Observatory of the Carnegie Institution for Science has provided a superlative window in the Southern Hemisphere for exploring the wonders of our Universe.

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Our solar system formed 4.5 billion years ago in an extremely chaotic environment and has evolved significantly over that time.

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This is an extraordinary time in human history.

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The Hubble sequence of galaxies resembles a simple classification chart, yet underneath the neatly aligned shapes and colors lie complex and violent...

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Washington, DC— Come watch middle and high school students in the nation’s capital show off their science and math skills in a full-day celebration of STEM education and educators at Dunbar Senior High School Saturday, March 19

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Washington, DC— A new study, based on the most-extensive set of measurements ever made in tide pools, suggests that ocean acidification will increasingly put many marine organisms at risk by exacerbating normal changes in ocean chemistry that occur overnight.

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Washington, D.C.—Michael Stambaugh, currently Managing Director of Investments at the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation will join the Carnegie Institution for Science as its first Chief Investment Officer on March 28, 2016.

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The lightest few elements in the periodic table formed minutes after the Big Bang.  Heavier chemical elements are created by stars, either from nuclear fusion in their interiors or in catastrophic explosions.  However, scientists have disagreed for nearly 60 years about how the...

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New work from an international team including Carnegie’s Ken Caldeira demonstrates that the planet’s remaining fossil fuel resources would be sufficient to melt nearly all of Antarctica if burned, leading to a 50- or 60-meter (160- to 200-foot) rise in

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Washington, DC—A team of astronomers from Carnegie and Western University in Ontario, Canada, has discovered one of the youngest and brightest free-floating, planet-like objects within relatively close proximity to the Sun.

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Do you know how a diamond is formed? Can you name one of the craters of Mercury? Have you ever held a fossilized shark tooth?

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Planet-hunting is an ongoing process that’s resulting in the discovery of more and more planets orbiting distant stars. But as the hunters learn more about the variety among the tremendous number of predicted planets out there, it’s important to refine their techniques.  New...

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Pasadena, CA— You can never predict what treasure might be hiding in your own basement.

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The Kuiper Belt, which has Pluto as the largest member, is a region of comet-like objects just beyond Neptune. This belt of objects has an outer edge, which we are only now able to explore in detail.

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Do you know how a diamond is formed? Can you name one of the craters of Mercury? Have you ever held a fossilized shark tooth? For anyone who stopped by the Carnegie booth at the USA Science & Engineering Festival this weekend, the answer to all of those questions would be a resounding...

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Stanford, CA— Four additional members of Stanford University’s faculty have been named Honorary Adjunct Staff Scientists at Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology.

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Twenty-five years ago, a small team of Philippine and US scientists worked feverishly to forecast what newly-awakened Mount Pinatubo might do, and to alert everyone from indigenous peoples to high tech military about what to expect and the possible...

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Washington, DC—New work from a research team led by Carnegie’s Anat Shahar contains some unexpected findings about iron chemistry under high-pressure conditions, such as those likely found in the Earth’s core, where iron predominates and creates our planet&rsquo

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Three experts judge ten young scientists as they spin tall-but-true tales of climate change, a cure for cancer, the search for life elsewhere, and much more - in 3 powerpoint-free minutes each! 

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Rebecca Albright, a postdoc in the Caldeira lab at Global Ecology since 2014, is the latest recipient of the newly formed Carnegie Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence (PIE) Awards. She has been working on ocean acidification, specifically the effects of ocean acidification on corals and coral...

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Stanford, CA— Algae may hold the key to feeding the world’s burgeoning population. Don’t worry; no one is going to make you eat them.

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Washington, DC— New work from a team including Carnegie’s Hanika Rizo and Richard Carlson, as well as Richard Walker from the University of Maryland, has found material in rock formations that dates back to shortly after Earth formed.

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Featured events

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Pasadena, CA— Carnegie’s Allan Sandage, who died in 2010, was a tremendously influential figure in the field of astronomy. His final paper, published posthumously, focuses on unraveling a surprising historical mystery related to one of his own seminal discoveries.

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Carnegie congratulates Mary-Claire King, one of our trustees, who last week was recognized by President Obama with the National Medal of Science for her “pioneering contributions to human genetics.”

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The results from a suite of environmental mercury studies done by the Carnegie Amazon Mercury Project (CAMEP) was used by the Peruvian government for the decision to announce this state of emergency. Read a Washington Post article on the emergency

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The results from a suite of environmental mercury studies done by the Carnegie Amazon Mercury Project (CAMEP) was used by the Peruvian government for the decision to announce this state of emergency. Read a...

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The STEM Funders Network (SFN) announced last week that the DC STEM Network, a partnership of the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) and the DC Office of the State Superintendent of  Education, has been selected as one of the 10 STEM Learning Ecosystems to join the STEM Learning...

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Washington, DC— Earth's magnetic field shields us from deadly cosmic radiation, and without it, life as we know it could not exist here. The motion of liquid iron in the planet’s outer core, a phenomenon called a “geodynamo,” generates the field.

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Ann McElwain, Dartmouth College’s Executive Director of Leadership Giving, will become the new Chief Development Officer at Carnegie Science in Washington, D.C., starting July 1, 2016.

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— Tiny transparent zebrafish are changing lives through the BioEYES program, which has now enrolled its 100,000 student. The engaging program was cofounded in 2002 by Carnegie’s Steve Farber. Over the weeklong course, students and teachers alike watch transparent zebrafish...

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Washington, DC— Using laboratory techniques to mimic the conditions found deep inside the Earth, a team of Carnegie scientists led by Ho-Kwang “Dave” Mao has identified a form of iron oxide that they believe could explain seismic and geothermal signatures in the

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Take a look at our new video and learn about why we think our scientists—who have the freedom to investigate their own bold ideas about space, earth, life—are redefining the pursuit of what’s possible.   

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Andrew Carnegie understood that science is unpredictable. He created the institution to support individuals of exceptional ability and passion and gave them the independence to pursue high-risk, high-reward science.

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Washington, DC— Hydrogen is the most-abundant element in the universe. It’s also the simplest—sporting only a single electron in each atom. But that simplicity is deceptive, because there is still so much we have to learn about hydrogen.

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Until now, there has not been a way to forecast eruptions of restless volcanoes because of the constant seismic activity and gas and steam emissions. Carnegie volcanologist Diana Roman, working with a team of scientists, has shown that periods of seismic quiet occur immediately before eruptions...

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Washington, DC— New work from Carnegie’s Peter Driscoll suggests Earth’s ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two.

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Climate change assessments must be more relevant to policymakers’ needs, say Carnegie’s Katharine Mach and Stéphane Hallegatte of the World Bank’s Climate Change Policy Team. In a commentary published by Nature and signed by colleagues, Mach and Hallegatte...

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Brown dwarfs are sometimes called failed stars. They’re stars’ dim, low-mass siblings and they fade in brightness over time. They’re fascinating to astronomers for a variety of reasons, but much about them remains unknown.

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Washington, DC— It turns out that forests in the Andean and western Amazonian regions of South America break long-understood rules about how ecosystems are put together, according to new research led by Carnegie’s Greg Asner and published in the Proceedings of the

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The Earthbound Planet Search Program has discovered hundreds of planets orbiting nearby stars using telescopes at Lick Observatory, Keck Observatory, the Anglo-Australian Observatory, Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory, and the ESO Paranal Observatory.  Our multi-national team has been

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At left, in optical light, UGC 1382 appears to be a simple elliptical galaxy. But spiral arms emerged when astronomers incorporated ultraviolet and deep optical data (middle).

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Baltimore, MD— As we age, the function and regenerative abilities of skeletal muscles deteriorate, which means it is difficult for the elderly to recover from injury or surgery.

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Plants have tiny pores on their leaves called stomata—Greek for mouths—through which they take in carbon dioxide from the air and from which water evaporates. New work reveals ways that the systems regulating the development of stomata in grasses could be harnessed to improve plant...

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ImagePasadena, CA— The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) has announced that t

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Astronomers have believed since the 1960s that a galaxy dubbed UGC 1382 was a relatively boring, small elliptical galaxy. Now, using a series of multi-wavelength surveys, astronomers, including Carnegie’s Mark Seibert, Barry Madore and Jeff Rich, have discovered that it is really a...

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Stanford, CA— With a growing world population and a changing climate, understanding how agriculturally important plants respond to drought is crucial.

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Carnegie’s Mark Seibert, Barry Madore, Jeff Rich, and team have discovered that what was believed since the 1960s to be a relatively boring, small elliptical galaxy dubbed UGC 1382 is really a colossal Giant Low Surface Brightness disk galaxy.

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Washington, DC— It is imperative that society learn more about how climate change contributes to episodic and very severe water quality impairments, such as the harmful algal bloom that caused Florida to declare a state of emergency earlier this month, says Carnegie’s

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Plants have tiny pores on their leaves called stomata—Greek for mouths—through which they take in carbon dioxide from the air and from which water evaporates.

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Scientists have looked for different ways to force hydrogen into a metallic state for decades. Metallic hydrogen is a holy grail for materials science because it could be used for superconductors, materials that have no resistance to the flow of electrons, increasing electrical efficiency many...

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Johanna Teske was awarded the third Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence (PIE) Award, which is made through nominations from the department directors and chosen by the Office of the President.

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Washington, DC—Offering a rare insider analysis of the climate assessment process, Carnegie’s Katharine Mach and colleagues at the Department of Global Ecology examined the writing and editing procedures by which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change creates s

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NOTICE: DR. PIERS SELLERS LECTURE "CREATING THE SCIENCE OF GLOBAL ECOLOGY" HAS BEEN CANCELED AND REPLACED BY DR. GREG ASNER'S LECTURE "EXPLORING AND MANAGING EARTH FROM THE SKY."

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Washington, DC— Well-understood physical and chemical processes can easily explain the alleged evidence of a secret, large-scale atmospheric spraying program, commonly referred to as “chemtrails” or “covert geoengineering,” concludes a new study from

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Benjamin Aderson, currently Managing Director of Legal Affairs at Pew Research Center, will join the Carnegie Institution for Science as its first General Counsel on August 15, 2016. 

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Learning about ‪photosynthesis is fun! Life as we know it on Earth couldn't exist without this amazing process. And what better way to understand and appreciate everything that plants and algae do for us than through this amazing song from Carnegie Plant Biology and Jonathan Mann?

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Brown dwarfs are smaller than stars, but more massive than giant planets. As such, they provide a natural link between astronomy and planetary science. However, they also show incredible variation when it comes to size, temperature, chemistry, and more, which makes them difficult to understand,...

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 An international team of astronomers including Carnegie’s Paul Butler has found clear evidence of a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our Solar System. The new world, designated Proxima b, orbits its cool red parent star every 11 days and has a temperature...

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Washington, DC— In the race to discover a proposed ninth planet in our Solar System, Carnegie’s Scott Sheppard and Chadwick Trujillo of Northern Arizona University have observed several never-before-seen objects at extreme distances from the Sun in our Solar System.

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Pasadena, CA—An international team of astronomers, including Carnegie’s Eric Persson, has charted the rise and fall of galaxies over 90 percent of cosmic history.

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A team of Carnegie scientists has discovered three giant planets in a binary star system composed of stellar ''twins'' that are also effectively siblings of our Sun. One star hosts two planets and the other hosts the third. The system represents the smallest-separation binary in...

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One of the longest-running, most comprehensive climate change experiments produced some surprises. Researchers subjected grassland ecosystems to sixteen possible future climates and measured ecosystem performance and sustainability. The study covered 17 years of plant growth, an important...

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Washington, DC— Cool brown dwarfs are a hot topic in astronomy right now. Smaller than stars and bigger than giant planets, they hold promise for helping us understand both stellar evolution and planet formation.

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Dwarf galaxies are enigmas wrapped in riddles. Although they are the smallest galaxies, they represent some of the biggest mysteries about our universe. While many dwarf galaxies surround our own Milky Way, there seem to be far too few of them compared with standard...

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Quasars are supermassive black holes that sit at the center of enormous galaxies, accreting matter. They shine so brightly that they are often referred to as beacons and are among the most-distant objects we can currently study. A team has discovered 63 new quasars from when the universe was...

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Using software tools developed by Near Zero, a research group hosted by the Carnegie Institution for Science’s Department of Global Ecology, a team of researchers has completed the largest expert survey yet on any energy technology, in this case wind energy.

 

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Please note that tickets are not required and seating is first come, first serve. Tickets from Eventbrite enable you to skip the sign-in process at the door, but do not guarantee a seat. 

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Please note that tickets are not required and seating is first come, first serve. Tickets from Eventbrite enable you to skip the sign-in process at the  door,  but do not guarantee a seat. 

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Seventy-five years ago, Carnegie scientist Harry Wells predicted a massive geomagnetic storm two days in advance. It disrupted electrical power and radio communication.

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For postdoc  appreciation week, Carnegie President Matt Scott presented “How to Give a Good Talk: Finding and Keeping a Job” at  3 PM Eastern at the Broad Branch Road campus. 

Streaming video

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From Carnegie President Matt Scott:

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Stanford, CA—The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Simons Foundation have awarded José Dinneny, of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholar grant.

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Washington, D.C.— Carnegie Science is excited to launch a new immersive program called Expedition Earth: Roads to Discovery.

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Baltimore, MD--BioEYES, the K-12 science education program headquartered at  Carnegie's Department of Embryology, was recognized with four other organizations by the General Motors Foundation, at the GM Baltimore Operations plant where they make transmissions.

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Washington, D.C.—  Zehra Nizami has been a graduate student and postdoc in Joe Gall’s lab at the Department of Embryology.

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When a star is young, it is often still surrounded by a primordial rotating disk of gas and dust from which planets can form. Astronomers like to find such disks because they might be able to catch the star partway through the planet-formation process, but it’s highly unusual to find...

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Pasadena, CA— A star known by the unassuming name of KIC 8462852 in the constellation Cygnus has been raising eyebrows both in and outside of the scientific community for the past year.

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Stanford, CA— A feature thought to make plants sensitive to drought could actually hold the key to them coping with it better, according to new findings published by eLife, from Kathryn Barton of the Carnegie Institution for Science (Department of Plant Biology).

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Stanford, CA— What would we do differently if sea level were to rise one foot per century versus one foot per decade? Until now, most policy and research has focused on adapting to specific amounts of climate change and not on how fast that climate change might happen.

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Baltimore, MD---Athletes, the elderly and those with degenerative muscle disease would all benefit from accelerated muscle repair. When skeletal muscles, those connected to the bone, are injured, muscle stem cells wake up from a dormant state and repair the damage.

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Stanford, CA—We generally think of inheritance as the genetic transfer from parent to offspring and that evolution moves toward greater complexity. But there are other ways that genes are transferred between organisms.

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Washington, DC— New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Alexander Goncharov has created a new extremely incompressible carbon nitride compound.

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If you want to work with DNA nanotechnology, you should study art. 

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Washington, DC— Did you know that there are at least 17 crystalline forms of ice, many of them formed under extreme pressures, such as those found in the interiors of frozen planets?

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Carnegie president emeritus and current trustee, Dick Meserve received the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star Award from the Japanese government October 20th for “his contributions towards strengthening science and technology relations between Japan and the United States of

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Washington, DC—A group of citizen scientists and professional astronomers, including Carnegie’s Jonathan Gagné, joined forces to discover an unusual hunting ground for exoplanets.

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Established in June of 2016 with a generous gift of $50,000 from Marilyn Fogel and Christopher Swarth, the Marilyn Fogel Endowed Fund for Internships will provide support for “very young budding scientists” who wish to “spend a summer getting their feet wet in research for the v

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Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory dedicated two and a half days this week to celebrating the legacy and vision of Marilyn Fogel, who spent 33 years there, doing groundbreaking research and mentoring generations of young scientists of all levels—from high school interns to...

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“Scientists are my best friends,” wildlife photographer Frans Lanting said during a retrospective program at Carnegie’s Washington, DC, headquarters last week.

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New work led by Carnegie’s Steven Farber, with help from Yixian Zheng’s lab, sheds light on how form follows function for intestinal cells responding to high-fat foods that are rich in cholesterol and triglycerides. It turns out that fatty foods cause the cells that line our...

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Baltimore, MD—A first-of-its-kind study on almost 20,000 K-12 underrepresented public school students shows that Project BioEYES, based at Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, is effective at increasing students’ science knowledge and positive attitudes about science.

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In the United States, the amount of nitrogen originating from human sources, particularly fertilizer, is four times the amount that comes from natural sources. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 28 percent of streams and 20 percent of lakes around the country experience high...

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Pasadena, CA – The Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) today announced the appointment of Walter E. Massey, PhD, and Taft Armandroff, PhD, to the positions of Board Chair and Vice Chair, respectively.

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Climate change and recent heat waves have put agricultural crops at risk, which means that understanding how plants respond to elevated temperatures is crucial for protecting our environment and food supply. For many plants, even a small increase in average temperature can profoundly affect...

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A new study explains how the world’s biggest and most-valuable diamonds formed—from metallic liquid deep inside Earth’s mantle. The research team studied large gem diamonds like the world-famous Cullinan or Lesotho Promise by examining their so-called “offcuts,”...

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Renowned astrophysicist and National Medal of Science awardee Vera Rubin passed away in Princeton N.J., the evening of December 25, 2016, at the age of 88. Rubin confirmed the existence of dark matter—the invisible material that makes up more than 90% of the mass of the universe. 

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Germanium may not be a household name like silicon, its group-mate on the periodic table, but it has great potential for use in next-generation electronics and energy technology. Of particular interest are forms of germanium that can be synthesized in the lab under extreme pressure conditions....

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Even though carbon is one of the most-abundant elements on Earth, it is actually very difficult to determine how much of it exists below the surface in Earth’s interior. Analysis by Carnegie’s Marion Le Voyer and Erik Hauri of crystals containing completely enclosed mantle magma with...

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Washington, D.C.—Global Ecology NSF Fellow Mary Whelan has been honored with Carnegie’s fifth Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence (PIE) Award. These prizes are made through nominations from the department directors and are chosen by the Office of the President.

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Washington, D.C.--Phase transitions surround us—for instance, liquid water changes to ice when frozen and to steam when boiled. Now, researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science* have discovered a new phenomenon of so-called metastability in a liquid phase.

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Pasadena, CA –The Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) announces the appointment of physicist Robert N. Shelton to become its president, effective February 20, 2017.

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The fund supports ...

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New remote sensing maps of the forest canopy in Peru identify new regions for conservation effort. Greg Asner and his Carnegie Airborne Observatory team used airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy, to identify preservation targets by undertaking a new approach to study global ecology—...

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Stanford, CA—New work from Carnegie’s Shouling Xu and Zhiyong Wang reveals that the process of synthesizing many important master proteins in plants involves extensive modification, or “tagging” by sugars after the protein is assembled.

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Yingwei Fei, a high-pressure experimentalist at the Geophysical Laboratory, and Peter Driscoll, theoretical geophysicist in the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, have been awarded a Carnegie Science Venture Grant for their project “Direct Shock Compression of Pre-synthesized Mantle Miner

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Washington, D.C.—In Earth’s interior, water (H2O) plays an important role in rock physics, but geoscientists rarely treat water in its constituent forms, that is as hydrogen plus oxygen.

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Since releasing its first images of space 5 years ago, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has produced many exciting and fundamental results, enabling transformational science in a wide range of astronomy and planetary science subjects, from the Solar System to the

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Dr. Ostrander’s team has taken advantage of naturally occurring variations in dog populations in order to

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Although helium is the second most-abundant element (after hydrogen) in the universe, it doesn’t play well with others. It is a member of a family of seven elements called the noble gases, which are called that because of their chemical aloofness—they don’t easily form...

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Naturally occurring gene drive systems rig the inheritance game and cause some genes to be preferentially inherited, “driving” them out into the population.

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Washington, DC— An international team of astronomers released the largest-ever compilation of exoplanet-detecting observations made using a technique called the radial velocity method.

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Supernovae are cosmic explosions where a single star can become as bright as a billion stars combined. Even though supernovae are crucial to the Universe, including producing the elements necessary for life, many mysteries remain. What powers them? Which stars are exploding? How do stars die?

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The formation of galaxies like our Milky Way involves gravity, dark matter, gases, star formation, and stellar explosions. Theoretical astrophysics is now revealing this complex process by using the world’s most powerful supercomputers to simulate galaxy formation. Dr.

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How do we find planets orbiting stars other than our Sun? How do we know what they’re made of, or if they’re Earth-like?  Dr.

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